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03/04/2021 9:04 PM
I have been trying Scott Rao Hario V60 pourover this week. 1:17 and blooming with 2 parts water the first 45 seconds then splitting the rest into 2 pours. A little stirring is included. We like it.

03/04/2021 11:35 AM
My brew ratio is 1:17 (exactly 59.5 g/L). That's roughly 8.5g per 5-oz cup.

02/27/2021 9:29 AM
I'm looking to hire someone to teach/help me to find the best roast profile for the 3 types of coffee that grow on my farm in nicaragua. I live in LA, but but could go anywhere in so cal with my Behmor for a roasting lesson. Please contact me if you're in

02/17/2021 7:20 PM
When your wife thinks 30 grams for a 6 cup setting is strong, you learn to drink muddy water when you are making coffee for both of you.

02/17/2021 8:32 AM
I use a rule of thumb of 60 grams per liter. 8 cups (1 liter, 32 oz) = 60 grams, 6 cups (3/4 liter, 24 oz) = 45 grams. 10 cups = 75 grams 12 cups = 90 grams

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Sugar content in roasted coffee
Unta
found this blog post.
http://www.jimsev...versation/


That blog led to this blog post.

http://deaton.wor...-your-cup/

and then this one.
http://deaton.wor...sweetness/

hope you can dig on Polysaccharides spliting off into Monosaccharides...

YUR buddy,
sean
Edited by seedlings on 10/25/2010 8:13 AM
Sean Harrington
educate.
Unta
My initial question is if Fructose is melting @ 230 F , @ what point is it no longer.. and if sucrose is breaking down to glucose and fructose starting @ 368 F +/- how long is the fructose going to last @ the higher temps. Burning?

Sean
Edited by Unta on 10/24/2010 11:32 PM
Sean Harrington
educate.
John Despres
Stove top test? Maybe some varieties of sugars cooked in a skillet on the stove with an IR thermometer and a stop watch?

Cook it 'til it burns, then do it again faster and then again, slower. And then some more.

Dunno what this will prove, but maybe something will come of it.

My head hurts.

John
Respect the bean.
John Despres
Fresh Roast 8, Gene Cafe, JYTT 1k, Quest M3, Mazzer Mini, Technivorm, various size presses and many more brewers.
John Despres
Ok, so there are sugar compounds left in roasted coffee.
Ok, so there are no sugar compounds left in roasted coffee.

Decisions, decisions...

My head hurts.

John
Respect the bean.
John Despres
Fresh Roast 8, Gene Cafe, JYTT 1k, Quest M3, Mazzer Mini, Technivorm, various size presses and many more brewers.
seedlings
http://edepot.wur...

Interesting reading (and illustrations) starting PDF Page 141, followed by a headache.

CHAD

Roaster: CoffeeAir II 2# DIY air roaster
Grinder: Vintage Grindmaster 500
Brewers: Vintage Cory DCU DCL, Aeropress, Press, Osaka Titanium pourover
Unta

Quote

John Despres wrote:
Stove top test? Maybe some varieties of sugars cooked in a skillet on the stove with an IR thermometer and a stop watch?

John


was onto this last night, have to give it a go..
sean
Sean Harrington
educate.
Dan
I think what you are talking about is the Malliard Reaction, also called carmelization. A good example is the browning on bread as it bakes. See: http://en.wikiped...d_reaction I suspect there are sugars reacting all the way up to the dreaded 3rd crack.

JETROASTER

Quote

seedlings wrote:
http://edepot.wur...

Interesting reading (and illustrations) starting PDF Page 141, followed by a headache.

CHAD


I thought I might read this on the Droid. I was wrong. Ouch.
Great info though. Thanks....i think -Scott
JETROASTER
...If I'm understanding even a little bit, it seems like simple sugars can be damaged by aggressive ramping prior to 1st C. Yes?
I need a nap. Scott
seedlings

Quote

freshbeans wrote:
...If I'm understanding even a little bit, it seems like simple sugars can be damaged by aggressive ramping prior to 1st C. Yes?
I need a nap. Scott


I read that too:

Quote

Following Carl Staubs theories of sucrose development I prolong the “golden period” where the color of the once-green coffee bean changes from pale yellow to bright orange. We allow the roaster to gently heat the beans and maintain a low minute-to-minute temperature increase. It is in this stage of the roast between minutes 2 and 7 – 8 and at 230-340°F that the Polysaccharides split of into Monosaccharides building a foundation of simple sugars for us to work with latter on.

Between 7 and 12 minutes and 240-392°F, we are starting to dig into the foundation of sweetness that we had just built, and the beans start the Maillard reaction, which is the caramelization of those simple sugars.


<scratches head> Haven't heard this before. Gentle in the middle of the roast? That's usually when I punch the pedal down.

CHAD
Roaster: CoffeeAir II 2# DIY air roaster
Grinder: Vintage Grindmaster 500
Brewers: Vintage Cory DCU DCL, Aeropress, Press, Osaka Titanium pourover
Unta

Quote

freshbeans wrote:
...If I'm understanding even a little bit, it seems like simple sugars can be damaged by aggressive ramping prior to 1st C. Yes?
I need a nap. Scott


The challenge here in my brain is whether or not sugars are the goal. Noone that ive read has shown anything to prove that fructrose is even still around by the time you hit 425 degress. Nor has there been any surety of what those monosaccrides(glucose, fructose) are degrading to. maybey that is the real goal how the degraded elements end up...
the reality for me right now, is what chad had said about hammering through the temps prior to first crack. Though i think hes refering to drying stage up untill 360-380.. then slowing things down. That seems to be somewhat of a consensus amongst a few of us, though...Things can always be improved upon..

beautiful thing here is, we can expirement and see what happens. The rules seem to be suggestions, that are up for discussion. roast it taste it record it...no if we could just test it...hmmmmm

mahalo.
Sean Harrington
educate.
JETROASTER
Most of what I've read is consistent with what I've been learning here at the HRO university.
In general, I've slowed the roasts down. More recently, I've been been slowing things down earlier.
....Up to 250 as fast as I can get there. After that, choose an inlet temp that provides the right time envelope.(550 for light roast, 650 for dark)
I've been avoiding the fast pace up to 370, just to see what happens.
So far, so good on the common WP stuff.

...My head hurts, but I like this thread. -Scott
scarter11

Quote

freshbeans wrote:
....Up to 250 as fast as I can get there. After that, choose an inlet temp that provides the right time envelope.(550 for light roast, 650 for dark)


Can you expound on what you mean by the "right time envelope"? Either by giving target bean RoR or total time after 250f and ending temp range. If we don't roast by inlet temp, this information is not necessarily helpful.
JETROASTER
This has been an experiment lately.
I was looking to extend all my roasting times, and found myself making corrections too late in the roast. So I began ignoring RoR up to 250, then I set inlet temp to say...600, and just let the load roll, just to see how it worked out.
(previously I'd be at 700, having to really throttle back later on)
So Lately, once I'm at 250-300BT, I'll set inlet temp,and let it roll.
I'm simply using what Rob referred to as the 'inherent profile' of air roasting machines. As the bean mass looses moisture and loosens up, heat transfer naturally becomes less aggressive, giving you a lower RoR.
I've found some starting temps that require very little adjustment later in the roast.
Once I get a bit more accustomed to it, I'll start making adjustments based on how different beans behave.
-Scott
JETROASTER
...In relation to this thread; I've backed off inlet temp early, in hopes of not damaging sugars. Scott
endlesscycles
Two comments:

Sugars aren't the only thing that is sweet; however I think it's aroma memory and body that creates the illusion of sweetness.

The lengthy maillard reaction time does exactly what you would think and nothing more; it creates a ton of roast flavor at the expense of origin flavor. It's the typical Dietrich roast flavor, in my experience. Good for "coffee" flavored coffee.
-Marshall Hance
Asheville, NC
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