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Roast Time?
jm82792
How does roast time effect coffee?
Not the roast but the time to get to the desired roast.
I've figured out(well confirmed) that pan roasting has more body then an air roast, but this is a question mark.
Edited by jm82792 on 03/01/2011 1:08 AM
 
seedlings
In general terms

0 to 300F is drying phase:
Too fast brings 'grassiness' in most coffees and 'ashyness' in some low altitude beans. Too slow will flatten or mute the flavors.

300F to first crack:
Too fast brings higher percieved sharp acidity, slower brings nuttiness, too slow brings 'baked' flavor

First crack to second crack:
Too fast tastes underdeveloped, flat. Too slow... um... can you take it too slow?

From 300F on the beans should NEVER drop in temperature, always increasing. The 300F figure is fudgy +/- 50F depending on who you ask.

Does this help?

CHAD
Edited by seedlings on 03/01/2011 10:46 AM
Roaster: CoffeeAir II 2# DIY air roaster
Grinder: Vintage Grindmaster 500
Brewers: Vintage Cory DCU DCL, Aeropress, Press, Osaka Titanium pourover
 
Third Crack
Speaking of can you go too slow from first crack onward as well as the comment about never letting the beans drop in temperature after the drying phase:
This can be a tricky concept when you can't directly measure bean temp. I have a Gene Cafe and my best results for a City roast involve dropping from 465 (exit temp) to 405 just before 1C. Some would say I might stall the roast with such a big drop. I have found that it extends the period from the start of 1C until dump at City roast the way I want. The 405 exit temp should still be above the bean temp leading into 1C but not by a lot. I then let the temp rise gradually (I use a variac) throughout 1C to about 445 at dump. Works well. Just for the record my drying phase takes 7 minutes, then typically 5 minutes from yellow to 1C and then about 3 minutes to dump. This might seem a bit too long overall (15 min) but its because of the extra time I give it in the drying phase which seems to give me good results. If I'm going to City+ or FC I simply drop from 465 to a temp higher than 405 and based on my desired roast level so that I get about the same time from 1C to dump. I am going to tweak this method for a while and then probably try something totally different just for fun.
Bob
 
jm82792
That makes sense :)
I've had some flatness and now I understand why :-)
Now for profiling, that's delaying or hastening particular portions of the roast stages correct?
I don't have anything but a heatgun but I'm hoping to build a pid"able" roaster with an arduino......
 
seedlings
A 'profile' is a time/temperature graph, or 'how long it took to get form initial temperature to the next to the ... to the end'.

'Profiling' is the name for trying different profiles until you get one that highlights a particular coffee.

CHAD
Roaster: CoffeeAir II 2# DIY air roaster
Grinder: Vintage Grindmaster 500
Brewers: Vintage Cory DCU DCL, Aeropress, Press, Osaka Titanium pourover
 
jm82792
Ah I see what you mean.
 
cwfritz
CHAD wrote:

"In general terms

0 to 300F is drying phase:
Too fast brings 'grassiness' in most coffees and 'ashyness' in some low altitude beans. Too slow will flatten or mute the flavors.

300F to first crack:
Too fast brings higher percieved sharp acidity, slower brings nuttiness, too slow brings 'baked' flavor

First crack to second crack:
Too fast tastes underdeveloped, flat. Too slow... um... can you take it too slow?"

So, about how long from 0 to 300F, 300 to FC, and FC to SC? I know the EXACT intervals depend on the variety etc and are what make up a profile, but can anyone provide some approximate guidelines?

Thanks.

Chris
 
Unta
Hey Chris welcome to the forum.
This is a basic profile thread, with some time references. http://forum.home...post_27929
We also have an entire section under the heading "coffee Roasting" called roasting profiles, there will be some good info there also.

Enjoy.
Sean
Sean Harrington
educate.
 
seedlings

Quote

cwfritz wrote:
CHAD wrote:

"In general terms

0 to 300F is drying phase:
Too fast brings 'grassiness' in most coffees and 'ashyness' in some low altitude beans. Too slow will flatten or mute the flavors.

300F to first crack:
Too fast brings higher percieved sharp acidity, slower brings nuttiness, too slow brings 'baked' flavor

First crack to second crack:
Too fast tastes underdeveloped, flat. Too slow... um... can you take it too slow?"

So, about how long from 0 to 300F, 300 to FC, and FC to SC? I know the EXACT intervals depend on the variety etc and are what make up a profile, but can anyone provide some approximate guidelines?

Thanks.

Chris


4 minutes each is a nice starter: 4 minutes to 300F, 4 more minutes to 400F, 4 more minutes to edge of second crack or ~440F

CHAD
Roaster: CoffeeAir II 2# DIY air roaster
Grinder: Vintage Grindmaster 500
Brewers: Vintage Cory DCU DCL, Aeropress, Press, Osaka Titanium pourover
 
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