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03/04/2021 9:04 PM
I have been trying Scott Rao Hario V60 pourover this week. 1:17 and blooming with 2 parts water the first 45 seconds then splitting the rest into 2 pours. A little stirring is included. We like it.

03/04/2021 11:35 AM
My brew ratio is 1:17 (exactly 59.5 g/L). That's roughly 8.5g per 5-oz cup.

02/27/2021 9:29 AM
I'm looking to hire someone to teach/help me to find the best roast profile for the 3 types of coffee that grow on my farm in nicaragua. I live in LA, but but could go anywhere in so cal with my Behmor for a roasting lesson. Please contact me if you're in

02/17/2021 7:20 PM
When your wife thinks 30 grams for a 6 cup setting is strong, you learn to drink muddy water when you are making coffee for both of you.

02/17/2021 8:32 AM
I use a rule of thumb of 60 grams per liter. 8 cups (1 liter, 32 oz) = 60 grams, 6 cups (3/4 liter, 24 oz) = 45 grams. 10 cups = 75 grams 12 cups = 90 grams

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Roaster Materials
BobbyS
Does it make any difference on a drum roaster how thick the endplates are?

Thanks!
seedlings
Too thin and you risk supporting the weight of the drum. Too thick and it will take a long time to preheat.

What are you maybe going to use?

CHAD
Roaster: CoffeeAir II 2# DIY air roaster
Grinder: Vintage Grindmaster 500
Brewers: Vintage Cory DCU DCL, Aeropress, Press, Osaka Titanium pourover
BobbyS
I'm thinking maybe 3/8 or 1/4 inch plate steel.
Ringo
I believe both would work great. Make sure you show us as your build, building is fun but watching a build helps the next builder not run into problems. Have fun with your build.
Ringo
All you need in life is ignorance and confidence, and then success is sure. Mark Twain
allenb
I second Ringo's request for posting a log of your build. We love to see em come together!

FWIW, 1/4" is thicker than Probat uses in their L12 which does 25 lb batches although the rear plate has reinforcements or spokes of some kind in addtion to the perf metal.

As Chad stated, anything thicker than necessary acts as a heat sink and really slows down heat up time. For a 1 to 2 pounder 14 or even 16 guage would work fine.

Allen
1/2 lb and 1 lb drum, Siemens Sirocco fluidbed, presspot, chemex, cajun biggin brewer from the backwoods of Louisiana
allenb
I need to qualify my comments on plate thickness.

This is only if you're supporting both ends of the drum and not doing a single rear plate hung arrangement.

Allen
1/2 lb and 1 lb drum, Siemens Sirocco fluidbed, presspot, chemex, cajun biggin brewer from the backwoods of Louisiana
BobbyS
Thanks for the replies. It will be a front and back plate supporting the drum. I just didn't want to go too thin and have to deal with warpage of the plates or insufficient support. When I get parts and stuff up to speed I will post some pics.


Edit: ab....what do you mean the rear plate has perf metal? It is not solid?
Edited by BobbyS on 07/31/2011 2:07 PM
seedlings
You could use perf or solid. Agree with Allen that 16ga would be a great choice.

CHAD
Roaster: CoffeeAir II 2# DIY air roaster
Grinder: Vintage Grindmaster 500
Brewers: Vintage Cory DCU DCL, Aeropress, Press, Osaka Titanium pourover
BobbyS
I think I didn't give enough info, like most noobs. Old brain too lol.

The drum I will be using is a 10" dia. piece of pipe 12" long with a wall thickness of .188. I will use a 3/4" shaft. It is fairly heavy and this was why I was thinking maybe I needed thicker endplates. At least the front where there are lots of holes. I may do like you say the Probat has, a thinner backplate with some reinforcement. Too thin it may have some flex parallel with the shaft and make the drum rub. I have learned a lot by reading here for quite some time and really enjoy the site.

Thanks!
allenb

Quote

BobbyS wrote:
I think I didn't give enough info, like most noobs. Old brain too lol.

The drum I will be using is a 10" dia. piece of pipe 12" long with a wall thickness of .188. I will use a 3/4" shaft. It is fairly heavy and this was why I was thinking maybe I needed thicker endplates. At least the front where there are lots of holes. I may do like you say the Probat has, a thinner backplate with some reinforcement. Too thin it may have some flex parallel with the shaft and make the drum rub. I have learned a lot by reading here for quite some time and really enjoy the site.

Thanks!


A 10" diameter should handle a good size batch of coffee!

The probat referred to has a three spoke hub mounted to the shaft supporting the front of the drum. The three spokes go from the shaft radially out to the drum rim. The spokes are a few inches back from the roaster front plate to give clearance for the trier and probes. Am I understanding correctly that your drum will have a front plate or are you referring to the roaster's front plate?

Allen
1/2 lb and 1 lb drum, Siemens Sirocco fluidbed, presspot, chemex, cajun biggin brewer from the backwoods of Louisiana
BobbyS
I am refering to the roasters front and rear plate.
BobbyS
What I am doing is moding one of the CharGriller smoke boxes to contain the drum. Then I plan on adding a firebox below it with propane pipe burners like Ringo did on his. I think I can mod/reinforce the roaster rear plate as it has a little air vent on it that can be controlled. Then I will knock off the existing front plate and put on a new one with sightglass, bean dump ect.
Dan
With a 10" drum, your housing will be at least 12" wide. What you want is for the end plates to be stiff enough that they don't buckle from the heat. If they do the shaft can seize on the bearings (unless they are self-aligning types). If the front plate buckles, it will either cause the drum to rub, let beans fall through the gap, or both. I suggest at least 1/8", and would try to find 3/16." One-quarter inch would be overkill, but is easier to find.
BobbyS
I can get 3/16" and I think I will try that and see how it works. It should be ok since the roaster front and rear plate will have very good radial support.
boom
Hey BobbyS

I have found that a thicker front and rear panel is best. I am currently using an 8mm mild steel front with a 2mm stainless steel cover plate bolted to the outer edge.

I started with a 5mm thinking that it would be good enough. I found that the intense heat generated by the burner warps the panel so much that it buldges outward, creating a nice space for any beans to fall through.

In addition to my 10mm front plate, I have a 45degree bent strip of 4mm steel welded to the inside of the front plate just under the drum. This should keep the panel from warping. The welded strip also allows any beans that fall out due to poor drum alignment to fall directly into a removable little bucket just under the front of the drum.

Make sure that if you use 2 kinds of materials, you allow for different expansion rates. The mounting holes in my stainless steel plate are larger than those of the mild steel plate, since the stainless expands more than the mild steel.
A good espresso should give you hair on your chest!

Nuova Simonelli Mac Cup S, Mazzer Super Jolly, 1962 Faema President 2-group Lever, 1960 Faema Urania Grinder, 2kg profile controlled roaster
BobbyS

Quote

boom wrote:
Hey BobbyS

I have found that a thicker front and rear panel is best. I am currently using an 8mm mild steel front with a 2mm stainless steel cover plate bolted to the outer edge.

I started with a 5mm thinking that it would be good enough. I found that the intense heat generated by the burner warps the panel so much that it buldges outward, creating a nice space for any beans to fall through.

In addition to my 10mm front plate, I have a 45degree bent strip of 4mm steel welded to the inside of the front plate just under the drum. This should keep the panel from warping. The welded strip also allows any beans that fall out due to poor drum alignment to fall directly into a removable little bucket just under the front of the drum.

Make sure that if you use 2 kinds of materials, you allow for different expansion rates. The mounting holes in my stainless steel plate are larger than those of the mild steel plate, since the stainless expands more than the mild steel.


I enjoyed all of your earlier posts on your roaster and it's good to see you back! Could you post a pic of how you have your front plate please. I think I know what you mean but not 100% sure.


Thanks!
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