topbanner.gif
Login
Username

Password




Not a member yet?
Click here to register.

Forgotten your password?
Request a new one here.
Shoutbox
You must login to post a message.

04/16/2021 2:04 PM
SkipG welcome cup

04/16/2021 2:03 PM
meeuw2000 Welcome welcome cup

04/16/2021 8:29 AM
welcome cupfrankvw

04/13/2021 3:24 PM
Welcome DonnaReeves

04/13/2021 1:53 PM
Welcome to new member Ccelli Beans

Users Online
Guests Online: 18

Members Online: 0

Total Members: 7,159
Newest Member: meeuw2000
In Memory Of Ginny
Donations

Latest Donations
JackH - 25.00
snwcmpr - 10.00
Anonymous - 2.00
Anonymous - 5.00
Anonymous - 5.00

View Thread

Who is here? 1 guest(s)
 Print Thread
FZ-RR-700.. continued
mk1
Jon,
I think the roaster being made out of copper is critical to the process. Copper conducts similarly to aluminum but is much easier to fabricate and holds up far better. The cost of the grain is the reason why Captain Crunch costs so much? I don't think so. If you're fabricating one of these yourself the overhead and marketing costs are low. Go with the copper. Two copper bowls or a large copper float + a little sheet stock and Bob's your uncle.

Mark
sierranomad
Thanks Mark. Good idea.

Guess I'm waffling a bit on which method to try, but the idea behind the fz-rr-700 seems unique. like "thinking out of the box".

One opinion on the Coffee Snobs thread was that the beans are allowed to "roast in their juices (carmelized, sugar)" instead of being parched/leached by a dry wind (my wording of what I took away from the thread).

Don't know if it was just marketing hype. I'm greener than the greenest bean :). Interesting though. I may give it a go.
Jon
mk1
Jon,
It does sound very interesting, and possibly quite easy to build. Any joining of cooper done with the modern solder (NSF) would be high temp enough. For a start checkout:
http://www.mcmast...es/=fghykm
A small roaster could use an oblong copper float, larger, a round cut in half and extended with copper sheet.

Mark
Edited by seedlings on 12/21/2011 7:49 AM
sierranomad
Thanks for the tips and link Mark. I'll keep it in mind. At the moment I'm leaning toward trying the Breadmaker. Since I've never roasted before I'd like to see the beans during the process. Don't know, but some experience might be good before trying a method that doesn't allow you to see the beans during the process. But I'll definitely keep this idea in mind.
Jon
mk1
Jon,
I just did my first roast with a HGBM. I highly recommend the method.

Mark
sierranomad
Thanks Mark ;)
Jon
seedlings
You don't even 'need' a bread maker. Use a SS bowl from the kitchen and hold the heatgun with one hand and stir the beans with a wooden spoon with your free hand.

CHAD
Roaster: CoffeeAir II 2# DIY air roaster
Grinder: Vintage Grindmaster 500
Brewers: Vintage Cory DCU DCL, Aeropress, Press, Osaka Titanium pourover
sierranomad
I'll give that a try before I get the breadmaker done. I already have a breadmaker. The heating element doesn't work, so it's of no use to Mindy (my wife). But it's a "Two loaf" breadmaker. Not sure yet whether that's going to be a good thing or just make things harder. I also already have a heat gun so I'm pretty well set. Only thing I don't like about the breadmaker is that people seem to go through Heat Guns.

But I'll probably need more coffee before I'm done with the breadmaker so I'll likely try the stainless steel bowl.
Jon
seedlings
You can use the two loaf breadmaker to roast more beans per batch!

I think the reason why some heatguns fail prematurely has to do with hot air coming back up and being pumped into the heatgun instead of cool air. If you use a lid you'll be fine (I still have a heatgun that has done a couple years of roasts with a breadmaker). Alternately, you can rest the heatgun at an angle, or use a small piece of ductwork to keep it out of the hot air.

CHAD
Roaster: CoffeeAir II 2# DIY air roaster
Grinder: Vintage Grindmaster 500
Brewers: Vintage Cory DCU DCL, Aeropress, Press, Osaka Titanium pourover
JackH

Quote

seedlings wrote:
You can use the two loaf breadmaker to roast more beans per batch!

I think the reason why some heatguns fail prematurely has to do with hot air coming back up and being pumped into the heatgun instead of cool air. If you use a lid you'll be fine (I still have a heatgun that has done a couple years of roasts with a breadmaker). Alternately, you can rest the heatgun at an angle, or use a small piece of ductwork to keep it out of the hot air.

CHAD


I like to try and get the heatguns that have a heat and cool setting where you can switch to cool and run it for a while after a long heat session. I am not sure if this saves the elements. I would think it should help.
sierranomad

Quote

seedlings wrote:
Alternately, you can rest the heatgun at an angle, or use a small piece of ductwork to keep it out of the hot air.

CHAD


Ductwork to keep it at an angle from the flow of air, in effect extending and putting an angle on the heat guns' tip?
Jon
sierranomad

Quote

seedlings wrote:
Use a SS bowl from the kitchen and hold the heatgun with one hand and stir the beans with a wooden spoon with your free hand.

CHAD


I've been giving this some thought; considering setting the stainless steel bowl in a bucket with water, to prevent loss of heat through the thin layer of the bowl. Does this make sense? If so, I'm thinking the water should be hot, again, to avoid loss of heat through the bowl?
Jon
seedlings
I was thinking like this:

http://homeroaste...ead_id=949

CHAD
Roaster: CoffeeAir II 2# DIY air roaster
Grinder: Vintage Grindmaster 500
Brewers: Vintage Cory DCU DCL, Aeropress, Press, Osaka Titanium pourover
sierranomad
Ahh. Thanks!
Jon
allenb

Quote

sierranomad wrote:

Quote

seedlings wrote:
Use a SS bowl from the kitchen and hold the heatgun with one hand and stir the beans with a wooden spoon with your free hand.

CHAD


I've been giving this some thought; considering setting the stainless steel bowl in a bucket with water, to prevent loss of heat through the thin layer of the bowl. Does this make sense? If so, I'm thinking the water should be hot, again, to avoid loss of heat through the bowl?


Water is never a good idea anywhere in a coffee roasting system except for some of the large commercial roasters that require an initial water spray quench for cooldown to speed up cooling.

The vapor that would be emitted from underneath the bowl as it heated up would limit the roasters ability to heat effectively IMO.

Allen
1/2 lb and 1 lb drum, Siemens Sirocco fluidbed, presspot, chemex, cajun biggin brewer from the backwoods of Louisiana
Dan
Try it! <snicker> In Boy Scouts we boiled water in a paper cup over a tiny campfire. The energy it took to turn water into vapor prevented the paper from reaching ignition temperature.

For your roaster, the water will act as a heat sink, beginning to boil at 212, way before your beans get to 1st crack, let alone finished. You'll eventually get to 2nd crack, but only after you have boiled all the water!
sierranomad
Glad I asked :)
Jon
GaryatGala
I don;t see any videos about the baby roaster apart from the one done by CoffeeTech.
There's a number of KKTO, Behmors,Hottop, Genecafes etc. but no baby roasters.

Hands up if anyone would like me to produce a half decent video of a baby roast?

BBQ grill
GaryatGala attached the following image:
101_2962_small.jpg

Another member of the KKTO rider's club, together with coretto, FZ-RR700 Baby Roaster and a sad sack of less than 20 kilograms of greens.
ginny
we like all vids of roasters, got one, post away and thanks Gary...

ginny

beach
GaryatGala
And.....here it is.
Perhaps the world's first and only video of the FZRR700 Baby Roaster by a home user!

I,m still surprised no one up til now has done a video of their roast on the baby.

The main reason I suppose is to reveal the artisan nature of the roaster.
Very much hands on and using a flame, agitation using human effort and using the senses of sight, sound and hearing along the way of the process.
No electricity, and no motor noises, unlike other roasters.

My preference is to use the roaster for single origins, especially for manual brewing.
It roasts well for light roasts, even though it is equally adept at espresso level roasts too.
I like the way that it is easy to hear the cracks due to the copper drum walls and the lack of ambient noise.
The roaster also reacts quickly to change of heat input.
Produces a great tasting result.

The negative side is the inability to roast large batches and the manual aspect.
Wind may impact on the roast if done outside on a gas butane camping stove for example and therefore affect the outcome.
Mine is done in the kitchen with air con on to extract odours and smoke.

Here are the links.

[video]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DNbUBPH2eI4[/video]


[video]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3A6CKKaG5d4[/video]



I'm not good at making videos so please excuse me for the stammering..

You saw it here first. Enjoy. BBQ grill
Edited by ginny on 01/23/2014 8:56 AM
Another member of the KKTO rider's club, together with coretto, FZ-RR700 Baby Roaster and a sad sack of less than 20 kilograms of greens.
Jump to Forum:

Similar Threads

Thread Forum Replies Last Post
Coffee Humor continued... Coffee Humor 9 05/06/2019 8:48 AM
Homeroasters Association Logo, and all Content, Images, and Icons © 2005-2016 Homeroasters Association - Logos are the property of their respective owners.
Powered by PHP-Fusion Copyright © 2021 PHP-Fusion Inc
Released as free software without warranties under GNU Affero GPL v3
Designed with by NetriX