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Have you roasted grains for beer?
Dan
Have any of your roasted anything other than coffee beans? Say barley, hops, buckwheat, or sorghum? Roasting, or toasting, is used to change the flavor and color of beer. The reason I ask is because the local brewer wants me to help them with some new formulas before they invest in equipment.
Lylabrown
I've done some toasting of barley and wheat. It's really similar to roasting coffee beans.
The temperature is similar (250-400), but the time is a bit longer - 15-30 min for most. Some darker toasts can take up to an hour. I've always done mine in a skillet on the BBQ stirring constantly. For the darker toasts I have to mist the grains with water towards the end to avoid scorching.

A solid drum roaster similar to your sample roaster would work well here. Drum size would have to be bigger on account of the lower mass-to-volume of grains.
JETROASTER
I haven't, but I'm curious how air-roasting might work. The scorching would be less of an issue.

I may have to look into this one. Micro-roasters for the micro-brewery crowd. Sounds intriguing.
-Scott
sabalism
Roasting barley or whet or sorghum for beer is similar but different in that it takes same heat but, like said, different ramps. Buy all very similar. Barley has a bit of ab art to getting quality fermentable sugars and just a black charred mess. Also, the smoke from an open wood fire is much more noticable in beer than coffee. Drying or roasting grains over open smoke adds a delectable and tangible flavor to beer that is disgusting in some coffees. J
Jamie - I like coffee.
jedovaty
I've been using my kkto-style to roast almonds. Takes about 10-15 minutes, much more even than oven roasting, and definitely tasty. Sometimes good to make almond butter, too!
mk1
Dan,
I roast barley, wheat and malted oats for beer. Wheat, pearled barley, steel cut oats for beer and bread. I use my HGBM and it usually takes about 20-30m, much faster, more even and controllable compared to a cookie sheet in the oven. You can get terrific results. The process usually involves a slower ramp to desired temp than coffee beans even at full throttle on the heat because of the smaller size of the media (I have an excess of heat). It is usually not desirable or necessary to go any higher than 250-280F. Once you achieve your temp, just go another 5-15M in order to achieve the desired level of roast. Aroma is the indicator and I use my bean cooler with a finer screen to keep them from coasting.
As your brewer probably knows, the grains must rest 24-48hrs after roasting to use or there are some funky phenols.
Off-hand I can't think of any special needs for the operation other than screen size for the cooler. Perforated drum would be the only undesirable configuration.
Also, the most unusual result is from the pearled barley. Really outstanding flavor and aroma(in bread). I haven't tried it in beer as I have a more than adequate stock of malt.

Roast Strong!

Mark
atalanta
I'd been wondering about this because I was going to pass on my FR to a beer maker friend before it croaked and made that moot.

But I'm thinking along those lines again as I'm trying to get BF into making his own beer (already have a lot of stuff from my wine/mead making). As my next roaster will be a drum roaster (the aromaroast is a loaner) anyone try this? or would I be better off doing it by hand on the grill (charcoal/wood)?
Dan
Thanks everyone, this is really helpful. I now feel confident enough to help them with some experimental recipes by toasting some grains for them.
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