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My 1st roasts on new HT (B2k)
smatty1
wow! That was not what i was expecting at all! Much faster than I anticipated. I followed this one pretty closely: http://hottopusa.com/profile2.pdf

First crack began aroun 8:20 or so. I was just flailing around adjusting fan and heat element half willy nilly. I manual ejected around 10:20. 2nd crack had already begun! Beans look nice though...just not what I was trying to do!
That was a Kenya Nyeri from sweetmarias

2nd roast.....Bali Nat Kintimani: C1 was about 9:08. @ 10:00 I lowered heat to 30%. Here's the head scratcher for me....It auto ejected @ 10:32. sounded like 2nd crack was starting?! Again...beans look great...just not was I was trying to do...
Randy G
Did you weigh the beans on an accurate scale? We recommend 250 grams, particularly when starting out. Roasting less than that will cause very fast roasts. I have approximately 120 volts at my home, and I roast 260 grams. I hit 1st in about 9˝ to 10 minutes. I turn down the heat about 30 seconds before the beginning of first.

Please be aware that the profile article was written a while ago and the factory has changed the way the roasters work a few times. Use what you learned from those roasts and keep working at it. Once you learn what temperatures are displayed when specific events happen you can then predict and act accordingly.

For espresso I do a full city (to just at the beginning of second), and it takes about 14˝ minutes.

Life's too short to drink bad coffee.
smatty1

Quote

Randy G wrote:

Did you weigh the beans on an accurate scale? We recommend 250 grams, particularly when starting out. Roasting less than that will cause very fast roasts. I have approximately 120 volts at my home, and I roast 260 grams. I hit 1st in about 9˝ to 10 minutes. I turn down the heat about 30 seconds before the beginning of first.

Please be aware that the profile article was written a while ago and the factory has changed the way the roasters work a few times. Use what you learned from those roasts and keep working at it. Once you learn what temperatures are displayed when specific events happen you can then predict and act accordingly.

For espresso I do a full city (to just at the beginning of second), and it takes about 14˝ minutes.

I just use a food scale to weigh out 8 0z like I always did with my gene cafe. Minor flux in weight didnt seem to make much of a difference in the GC. Maybe they do in the HT? I was expecting the timing of events to be on par with the gene cafe and they were not at all.
Is there a better base profile I should use as a starting point?
Randy G
Don't be so concerned about nuances right now. Get a feel for the roaster, document at what temperatures things happen, and build on that. The critical temperatures to note are:
1 - When the drying phase is fairly well over. That is when the beans go from green to tan
2 - When 1st crack begins
3 - When 2nd crack begins
For now, concentrate on the later two. Turn the heat down before the beginning of first. The goal is to get a first crack that lasts about 90 seconds and about a 90 second gap between the end of first and beginning of second (or when 2nd is about to start). Once you have that in hand you can work from there.

Life's too short to drink bad coffee.
smatty1

Quote

Randy G wrote:

Don't be so concerned about nuances right now. Get a feel for the roaster, document at what temperatures things happen, and build on that. The critical temperatures to note are:
1 - When the drying phase is fairly well over. That is when the beans go from green to tan
2 - When 1st crack begins
3 - When 2nd crack begins
For now, concentrate on the later two. Turn the heat down before the beginning of first. The goal is to get a first crack that lasts about 90 seconds and about a 90 second gap between the end of first and beginning of second (or when 2nd is about to start). Once you have that in hand you can work from there.


Ok, thanks Randy. What should the heat be turned to before 1st crack? My 2 roasts tell me around 30%?
Randy G
We have to go back to the bean mass. All ideas I are giving are based on 250 grams. It also has to do with line voltage. I have 120. Bean mass, voltage, ben density and moisture level, ambient temperatures, and even slight individual differences between roasters all have an effect. But 30% is pretty low unless you are aiming at a very light roast, ejected at the very end of first. I would say fan at 25% at around 280 degrees, then setting heat to about 80% and fan at 50% about one minute (15-20 degrees) before 1st, and then heat to about 60% near the end of first would be a good start, then as stated previously, see how that works and adjust from there.

If you are using a mechanical spring scale, they are quite inaccurate. I recommend a digital scale. Like THIS would work. And the American Weigh AMW-2000 is touted by users as being very good. I just got the Bonavita scale and I am extremely happy with it. It is a VERY high quality piece of equipment! Very fast response and highly sensitive. (Links given as examples only. SHop around.)

Life's too short to drink bad coffee.
smatty1

Quote

Randy G wrote:

We have to go back to the bean mass. All ideas I are giving are based on 250 grams. It also has to do with line voltage. I have 120. Bean mass, voltage, ben density and moisture level, ambient temperatures, and even slight individual differences between roasters all have an effect. But 30% is pretty low unless you are aiming at a very light roast, ejected at the very end of first. I would say fan at 25% at around 280 degrees, then setting heat to about 80% and fan at 50% about one minute (15-20 degrees) before 1st, and then heat to about 60% near the end of first would be a good start, then as stated previously, see how that works and adjust from there.

If you are using a mechanical spring scale, they are quite inaccurate. I recommend a digital scale. Like THIS would work. And the American Weigh AMW-2000 is touted by users as being very good. I just got the Bonavita scale and I am extremely happy with it. It is a VERY high quality piece of equipment! Very fast response and highly sensitive. (Links given as examples only. SHop around.)


Ok thanks. In my years with the Gene Cafe, it seemed slight variances had very little effect, if any, on roast. Obviously this is a very different machine. This is gonna be fun! ;)
*If I measure out 250 grams out of a lb, wont that leave an uneven half? I buy mostly lb bags....I like variety ;)
Barrie
You may have to divide 456gm by 2. 228 gm will be a bit faster than 250 but should be very manageable (I like 252 as there are 5 of those in a 5lb bag). It is all a question of working with a bean and batch size that you like, and sticking with them until you and your machine get to know each other. A pound of this and a pound of that will only confuse both of you. Roflmao

Incidentally, I also upgraded from a GC just over a year ago, because I am deaf and could not hear the cracks. I have a comparison in the download section.

Good luck!
Barrie (San Diego, CA)
"So much to learn, so little time."
Hottop 2K+., Artisan, Jura Capresso ENA 3 (i.e. espresso).
snwcmpr
Barrie, you mean 9, right? You get 9 roasts out of a 5 lb bag.

When I had a HT, I roasted 227 (or a little more if the purchase was a little bit more), as it was a half pound. That turned out well for me, I bought beans in 1, 2, 5, or 10 lb lots. That way I didn't have leftovers.

Barrie's document can help a lot to transition from the GC, and Randy is the go to guy for HT.

There are a lot of threads here about using the HT without any modifications.
And a lot of posts about modifying, too. I would suggest Randy's method of adding a bean temperature probe.

Ken in NC
--------------
Backwoods Roaster
"I wish I could taste as well as I wish I could roast."

As Abraham Lincoln said "Do not trust everything you read on the internet".
Barrie
i do mean 9 of course. Just one more piece of evidence unerlining the passing years?
Barrie (San Diego, CA)
"So much to learn, so little time."
Hottop 2K+., Artisan, Jura Capresso ENA 3 (i.e. espresso).
az erik
Funny I didn't even realize this until you said. I had swiched from the 235g to 250 (winter) 260(summer) and never even thought about the fact I didn't have extra beans left.
smatty1
" But 30% is pretty low unless you are aiming at a very light roast, ejected at the very end of first."

Randy, are you saying the reason i got the premature eject is because I had the heat element turned down too low? Still scratching my head on that one?
Randy G
I do not think I have ever set the heat to 30% during a roast. I think it reflects that you should either use a bit more airflow or you are roasting less than 250 grams, or have very high voltage there. The same factors can cause the heat to increase fast at the end of the roast causing the early eject. You mentioned times but not temperature when the beans were ejected early. The only other thing I can think of is it hit the safety point and you did not hit a button to continue the roast.

I once was showing my Hottop at a local coffee shop that roasts its own coffee. He did not have a scale so I estimated. Poorly. Set a batch of beans on fire and filled the shop with smoke. The customers said it smelled good. BBQ grill

Life's too short to drink bad coffee.
smatty1

Quote

Randy G wrote:

I do not think I have ever set the heat to 30% during a roast. I think it reflects that you should either use a bit more airflow or you are roasting less than 250 grams, or have very high voltage there. The same factors can cause the heat to increase fast at the end of the roast causing the early eject. You mentioned times but not temperature when the beans were ejected early. The only other thing I can think of is it hit the safety point and you did not hit a button to continue the roast.

I once was showing my Hottop at a local coffee shop that roasts its own coffee. He did not have a scale so I estimated. Poorly. Set a batch of beans on fire and filled the shop with smoke. The customers said it smelled good. BBQ grill

Ok point taken. I'll get a better scale. Everything happened so fast and all I logged was times. I'll log temps and times now and go from there. Thanks!
smatty1
First tasting of roasts: Deeper and richer than with the gene cafe. I may have to back off on amount of coffee per brew. Very pleased with the results so far...and those were roasts that were not exactly under my control!
smatty1
Found this at Tuesday Morning for $14.99 today....http://www.amazon...B004E8EB04
smatty1
Thanks for the direction guys! roast 3 felt much more under my control. 227g Guatemala Franciso Mendez.
End of drying 325F/ 5:00
C1- 388F/ 7:50
End of C1-420F/ 10:00
End of roast by manual eject- 426F/ 10:20

Beans look like the nice FC I was shooting for. And now we wait... ;)
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