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Fluid Bed Roaster using Beer Gear
JETROASTER
It's a collision of two worlds. This is the body of a current project. It's not active at the moment but, as it related to another thread, I figured I'd put it out there. These ready made fermenting buckets seemed really well suited for a conical fluid bed roaster. SS Brewtech is the company that supplies them. They are slightly tapered with a 45dg conical bottom, nicely fit latching lid, all 304 stainless, and well made for $190.00us ea.
The ones pictured are 13" across the top. There is a smaller version as well.
With very little extra work, sanitary fittings (2"ferrules) have been welded to the bottom of the upper cone as the entry to the RC (roast chamber). 3" ferrules have been bolted to both lids. The upper for exhaust/bean evacuation and the lower to connect the combustion chamber with the RC. Everything gets tied together with sanitary clamps.
If you're struggling to make something a bit larger, these fermenters might be a good way to go.
Cheers, -Scott
JETROASTER attached the following images:
cmbstn_n_rc.jpg lid_w_ferrule.jpg rc15w_ferrules.jpg
allenb
Scott, this is a fantastic find. If I were going to build a roaster for a small craft roasting shop I would absolutely look at these before trying to fabricate or job out the RC. These have everything you need other than the inlet perf plate. If one considers the labor hours involved in fabbing an RC of this size, the cost you've shown is a fraction of what it would take.

I'm looking forward to seeing what you've got up your sleeve with these? Don't make us wait more than a few months to get a look at where you're heading! smoking

Allen
1/2 lb and 1 lb drum, Siemens Sirocco fluidbed, presspot, chemex, cajun biggin brewer from the backwoods of Louisiana
JETROASTER
The fabrication cost of a completely different prototype is exactly what is holding this one up. Building completely from scratch is very expensive. Part of it is the materials, but labor is the biggie. Finding a ready made shortcut like this was pretty refreshing.
It is basically going to be the Max Heatgun on steroids;
http://forum.home...wstart=100

By the end of it, I intend to use a total of 3, maybe 4 of these chambers. The #1 bottom chamber is for blower/combustion, above it is #2 the RC. Not pictured will be chamber#3 above the RC as a cooling chamber. i had considered using a 4th as a cyclonic, but I've sourced a well sized cyclonic for around $120.00. Why reinvent the wheel !?!
I'll get started again once the current project starts testing. Cheers, Scott
JETROASTER attached the following image:
spike_front_2.jpg
allenb
Scott, FYI, there's not a lot going on in new fluidbed designs these days from what I'm seeing. So, you're multi chambered new design will be a refreshing new entry!
Looking forward to seeing this baby browning some beans!

Allen
1/2 lb and 1 lb drum, Siemens Sirocco fluidbed, presspot, chemex, cajun biggin brewer from the backwoods of Louisiana
JETROASTER
As per an earlier request (Allen), this machine will sport a glass combustion casing. Seen here getting sized up before welding, upside down, resting on the RC ferrules , through the combustion housing lid. There is no combustion liner or fuel control constructed yet, I'm going to get some pro help for this one.
This leaves enough room in the combustion/blower housing for my all time favorite blower, (ametek 115334), fuel control and a blower manifold of some sort.
Again, this thing is currently a dust collector, I hope to be back on it in 2 months. Cheers, Scott
JETROASTER attached the following image:
cmbst.jpg
allenb
OOOOH, glass and fire! This is going to be nice I can tell already.

Can you fit one of these in the glass chamber?
allenb attached the following image:
low_nox_head_high_fire_trans.png

1/2 lb and 1 lb drum, Siemens Sirocco fluidbed, presspot, chemex, cajun biggin brewer from the backwoods of Louisiana
allenb
Or maybe this one:


1/2 lb and 1 lb drum, Siemens Sirocco fluidbed, presspot, chemex, cajun biggin brewer from the backwoods of Louisiana
JETROASTER
Nice looking stuff!! I've come to realize that the problem for air roasting coffee is not finding a burner. Burners are everywhere. Achieving dilution is the problem. Getting fire down to a usable temperature within a compact design seems to be the perennial issue. ....enter the can type combustor. Jetroaster.
Cheers, Scott
JETROASTER attached the following image:
combustion_1.jpg
btreichel
I've been looking at the small low pressure Cajun burner however I'm worried if it will stay light in the airflow from the fan.
allenb
Pretty much any burner will work in the air stream of a fluidbed roaster as long as you design it so the burner along with it's venturi assembly both share the same high pressure air side of your cabinet so as to not have high pressure air blowing back through the burner and out the venturi. If you find any excessive turbulence with the flame at low output, simply create a sheet metal baffle to calm the air around the flame.

Allen
1/2 lb and 1 lb drum, Siemens Sirocco fluidbed, presspot, chemex, cajun biggin brewer from the backwoods of Louisiana
allenb

Quote

JETROASTER wrote:

Nice looking stuff!! I've come to realize that the problem for air roasting coffee is not finding a burner. Burners are everywhere. Achieving dilution is the problem. Getting fire down to a usable temperature within a compact design seems to be the perennial issue. ....enter the can type combustor. Jetroaster.
Cheers, Scott


Yes indeed and I look forward to seeing this in action but, will we see fire through the glass chamber?

Allen
1/2 lb and 1 lb drum, Siemens Sirocco fluidbed, presspot, chemex, cajun biggin brewer from the backwoods of Louisiana
btreichel
I'd like to be able to vary the bean load from 200 gr to 1 kG. That (I think, performing tests) requires a pretty good variation in air flow. Figuring a small low pressure banjo will do the trick.
JETROASTER
btr, I think I'd need to see at least a napkin sketch of what you're thinking for a furnace design. Start a thread if you haven't already. Allen had very good luck shielding a standard burner for a roaster in that size range.
Allen, the flame will be visible only through the perforations in the combustion liner. The largest set of holes will be 1/2" at the most, with other groups being smaller. The glass combustion casing will only be visible through a sight glass in the lid. It will serve as a reference for the operator, but from across the room...no. There may be some opportunity to get fancy in the future, I'll certainly try!. Cheers
Franklin

Quote

JETROASTER wrote:

Nice looking stuff!! I've come to realize that the problem for air roasting coffee is not finding a burner. Burners are everywhere. Achieving dilution is the problem. Getting fire down to a usable temperature within a compact design seems to be the perennial issue. ....enter the can type combustor. Jetroaster.
Cheers, Scott


By dilution are you attempting to lower stabilized temperature by using a "can" and thereby radiate heat from the can in an effort to minimize temperature in a smaller heat chamber? In the accompanying photo is this an example of this type of device? Nice, creative work.
JETROASTER
Thank You. The large lower can is simply a housing. Heat begins within the glass....sort of. No radiant heat at all. I've included an image that I think illustrates pretty well how the glass chamber works. The "can" (or combustion liner...the illustration refers to this component as a "flame tube". ) is within the air casing.
My previous photo of the glass chamber constitutes the combustion casing(referred to in this image as "air casing"). The liner or "can" will be positioned inside the casing. Dilution is accomplished completely within the (can) combustion liner. Relatively high pressure air within the casing is forced into the liner through a series of holes. In the early stage (primary) air propagates the flame. Next, secondary air serves to complete combustion, and in the final stage, leftover air simply dilutes the heated air down to a workable temperature. This little trick is what makes jet engines feasible.
Post #8 shows a more primitive version that has served me well for years. The new project is an advancement of this approach.
Cheers, Scott
JETROASTER attached the following image:
combstr_1.jpg
JETROASTER

Quote

By dilution are you attempting to lower stabilized temperature by using a "can" and thereby radiate heat from the can in an effort to minimize temperature in a smaller heat chamber? In the accompanying photo is this an example of this type of device?


Apologies. I failed to answer your question.
Yes, the photo of the chrome container is a "can type combustor". It forces fresh air into the flame tube. It's all a bit crude, but nearly bullet proof.
So, in the new design, the combustor will become an internal component, surrounded by the motor and fuel control housing vs. the inside out design I'd been struggling with.
Cheers, Scott
JETROASTER attached the following image:
jtrst10_b4_trdwn.jpg
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