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03/04/2021 9:04 PM
I have been trying Scott Rao Hario V60 pourover this week. 1:17 and blooming with 2 parts water the first 45 seconds then splitting the rest into 2 pours. A little stirring is included. We like it.

03/04/2021 11:35 AM
My brew ratio is 1:17 (exactly 59.5 g/L). That's roughly 8.5g per 5-oz cup.

02/27/2021 9:29 AM
I'm looking to hire someone to teach/help me to find the best roast profile for the 3 types of coffee that grow on my farm in nicaragua. I live in LA, but but could go anywhere in so cal with my Behmor for a roasting lesson. Please contact me if you're in

02/17/2021 7:20 PM
When your wife thinks 30 grams for a 6 cup setting is strong, you learn to drink muddy water when you are making coffee for both of you.

02/17/2021 8:32 AM
I use a rule of thumb of 60 grams per liter. 8 cups (1 liter, 32 oz) = 60 grams, 6 cups (3/4 liter, 24 oz) = 45 grams. 10 cups = 75 grams 12 cups = 90 grams

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Under roasted
seedlings
I have this Honduran that I had been taking to about 433-435F, and it's just alright. I decided to change it up and stop at 425 like I had been with a Brazil. 5 minutes to yellow, 300F, 4.5 minutes to first crack, 405, and just over 2 minutes to 426F.

I'm not one to wait days for resting, and the Brazil that roasted similarly, was great 12h later. Following morning, 36h rest, that Honduran is super sour! Once cooled it tasted like lemon rind (not in a good way). Eeek... It was pretty cheap, like $3/lb at Theta Ridge. Might have ruined the last 2 pounds of coffee on this batch... I'll give it a few days and try again.

CHAD
Edited by seedlings on 09/15/2016 4:22 PM
Roaster: CoffeeAir II 2# DIY air roaster
Grinder: Vintage Grindmaster 500
Brewers: Vintage Cory DCU DCL, Aeropress, Press, Osaka Titanium pourover
ChicagoJohn
I use a converted popcorn popper that shoots heated air vertically up the center (without manual stirring) so I guess that's somewhat comparable to your roasting method, perhaps. Anyway, I'm comparing my standard profile to yours (my thermocouple is placed toward the side where the beans are descending on their way back to the center to get into the air stream again, not directly in the main air stream itself traveling upward).

I hit 157C/315F at 4 minutes and then 1C (191C/376F +/- 3C/5F depending on origin) at 7 minutes with a ROR at that point of 7C/13F/min, then over the next 2 minutes up to 205C/401F where I turn on cooling.

Looking at 1C as an indicator of temperature (assuming Honduran isn't an anomaly -- I've not yet tried that one), there is about a 30F discrepancy in our temperature measurements. However, just on the basis of time after 1C to end of roast and your ROR, I would think it is at least possible that we may be doing something similar.

Am I correct in thinking you are stopping your roast, say for the Brazil, when you are definitely past 1C but not yet into 2C, and with 2 minutes of 10F ROR following 1C? If so, I think we're probably doing pretty much the same thing even though the measured temperatures are quite different.

Anyway, I recently experimented with an accelerated initial rate of temperature rise up to 1C with a similar curve shape though and end point in temperature and I noticed more acidity with both pour-over and Aeropress brewing. So I am adding a 2 lb bag I did like that to a deep freeze in a vacuum sealed Foodsaver bag for six months. In previous storage experiments, I found that vacuum sealed beans in a deep freeze, even when packed after 1 week storage at ambient, show considerable out-gassing and when removed are not a dense brick as when placed in the freezer; the bag has expanded and they are loose. And I noticed this had a beneficial effect (to my taste) on reducing acidity and other flavor elements. So that's why I'm including the faster roast sample with the rest of my Winter store of roasted beans.

If you have a way of removing as much oxygen as possible and then storing them that way for a longer period, even at ambient temperature, maybe it would help to release the lower molecular weight compounds gradually over time that are responsible for the acidity without at the same time causing undue oxidation. Might be worth a try with some of it anyway.
Edited by ChicagoJohn on 09/15/2016 9:56 PM
So many beans; so little time....
ChicagoJohn
Another thought I had this morning; maybe try a cold water extraction followed by filtering the supernatant liquid just to see if there are any differences in acid extraction. A side-by-side comparison with hot water extracted coffee, both tasted at ambient temperature, might produce some additional clues as to what's going on with your roast. The Aeropress seems to extract less acid with the water down at the 175F level.
So many beans; so little time....
oldgearhead
Three question:
1) Do you warm up the RC before starting each roast?
2) Do you start the time on dump or when the beans start to increase in temperature?
3) Was this the first batch of the day?

No oil on my beans...
walt_in_hawaii
Chad, I think the Hondurans have to be taken kinda dark, like at least 10-20 seconds into 2C. The sourness was probably always there, its just that when you drink it right away it has more up front volatiles hitting your tastebuds that the grassy and sour flavors are masked somewhat. I've had the same experience with ethiopians taken out really early; after a day or two I notice the sourness more as the up front citrus that I was looking for and concentrating on, fade into mellowness. The sourness won't improve with time, I'm afraid; the edge might come off a bit as they oxidize, but they will remain sour :(

I disagree with the wait 24 hour rule, I like mine in a pour over when the beans are still warm off the roaster, the SO flavors are much more noticeable then and far easier to identify. There is something to be said about waiting a day as other flavors do mature and change and the balance as a whole changes, but if what I'm after is the BERRY and strongest citrus, then there is just no comparison with the in-your-face warm roast pour over.
ginny

Quote

I disagree with the wait 24 hour rule



me too, I try all beans from the roaster as espresso's and once in a blue moon I get a crappy one but not often.

any pics of that roast Chad?


ginny



BBQ grill
seedlings
i206.photobucket.com/albums/bb54/seedlings/20160917_172034_zpsf7dxxdr8.jpg
Brazil 425F on left, Honduras 425F center and Etbiopia 433F right


oasted the Brazil right before this one, so it was preheated. First time I roasted the Honduras, I went to 442F, which was right before 2nd crack, smells were changing, but no snaps. I didn't like it. Thin, bland. Next was 435, and if was ok. Next two batches were 430-435 range and just meh.

The upside of a small batch roaster is more batches to tweak each one and fine tune. Downside of the larger 2# size is I only get five tries in 10 pounds.

I need to start drawing samples on the first batch to determine when to stop. If I could have a 425, 430, 435 and 440 sample, that would be great!

CHAD
Edited by seedlings on 09/17/2016 5:29 PM
Roaster: CoffeeAir II 2# DIY air roaster
Grinder: Vintage Grindmaster 500
Brewers: Vintage Cory DCU DCL, Aeropress, Press, Osaka Titanium pourover
seedlings

Quote

oldgearhead wrote:

Three question:
1) Do you warm up the RC before starting each roast?
2) Do you start the time on dump or when the beans start to increase in temperature?
3) Was this the first batch of the day?


Preheat, yes. Set up roaster, blower on and heat on - then I go get the coffee measured out, start roasting in 4-5min. Sart time on the dump. Usually bottoms out around 150F in 20 seconds or so.

CHAD
Roaster: CoffeeAir II 2# DIY air roaster
Grinder: Vintage Grindmaster 500
Brewers: Vintage Cory DCU DCL, Aeropress, Press, Osaka Titanium pourover
oldgearhead
My temperature probe is not in the beans but just below the beans where it records the drop in temperature when bean are introduced into a 350F glass RC. I start the time when the temp starts to rise and most batches are 11-13 minutes. Each home-built roaster is a one-of-a-kind animal. So, how did it taste?
No oil on my beans...
seedlings

Quote

oldgearhead wrote:

So, how did it taste?


SOUR! I put the rest of that batch in the deep freeze for an 'emergency stash' if I get busy and behind on roasting some time. Maybe serving time in the freezer will mellow it out.

CHAD
Roaster: CoffeeAir II 2# DIY air roaster
Grinder: Vintage Grindmaster 500
Brewers: Vintage Cory DCU DCL, Aeropress, Press, Osaka Titanium pourover
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