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Modifying a Bread Machine 2 - Re-Wiring
seedlings

Quote

seehad wrote:
Now I'm more confused. There are only 3 wires going to the motor. Dark grey is AC IN. Red and Yellow go to the cap.


OK, then. Scratch my previous post.

Then your machine should be exactly like how David presented it in the first couple of posts on page 1.

One side of AC from the plug goes to Grey.
Other side of AC from the plug goes to Yellow, which is connected to the Cap AND the Motor.
Red from motor goes to Red from Cap.

CHAD
seedlings attached the following image:
motor_1.jpg

Edited by seedlings on 03/01/2009 2:23 PM
Roaster: CoffeeAir II 2# DIY air roaster
Grinder: Vintage Grindmaster 500
Brewers: Vintage Cory DCU DCL, Aeropress, Press, Osaka Titanium pourover
 
seehad
Red, yellow and Dark grey
Edited by seehad on 03/01/2009 2:22 PM
 
seehad
Alright, excellent! Thank you
I just realized looking at it again that it was the grey wire that was actually ac out.
What confused me was thinking the cap was on the AC out side.

We are in business!! I'll put a switch on eventually but for now i've got some actual roasting to do.
Edited by seehad on 03/01/2009 3:00 PM
 
seedlings
Whew! Once you're up and running, let us know how you like roasting this way!

CHAD
Roaster: CoffeeAir II 2# DIY air roaster
Grinder: Vintage Grindmaster 500
Brewers: Vintage Cory DCU DCL, Aeropress, Press, Osaka Titanium pourover
 
seehad
I love it! I couldn't wait to finish my case roaster to start roasting. The BM/HG method seemed like the best bang for my buck. I decided to get the more expensive 12 speed heatgun from harbor freight for $40.

I removed the glass in the lid and cut an extra vent in the back. I used the screen that came out with the glass and covered the vent to cut back on the chaff. I ran the knead cycle to verify the machine would run continuous after the initial intermittent cycle. I let it run for about 10 minutes and figured that was enough...
For cooling, I bought a 2 gallon bucket and cut a hole for the shop-vac. I lined the lip of the bucket with electrical tape to create a gasket for the metal colander.

After weighing out my first blend I went to work starting the heatgun on setting 7 while the bread machine warmed up. Once the motor was continuous I tossed in the beans. 6.5 minutes later the bread machine decided to go back into intermittent mode and finally stopped spinning altogether. That lead me to this thread where I tried to make sense of rewiring it at midnight.

On to my first 2 roasts....

Roast one: I started the heatgun on level 7 of 12 and raised it a notch each 1.5 minutes. I was at full heat by 8 minutes. By 10 when I thought I would be getting near first crack i lowered it a couple of levels. Seemed like the roast was stalling so I jumped back up to high. First crack came at 15 minutes and lasted for a couple of minutes at which time I pulled it.

Roast two: I started it off at level 7 for the first 3.5 minutes then jumped up to level 10 at 5 minutes. 11 at 6.5 minutes and full heat at 8 minutes. Started getting first crack at 12:30 and I cut the heat back to 10. After 90 seconds went to 11 and full heat after another 90 seconds. 2nd crack started at 18:00 and I pulled it.

The cooling for both was insanely good. It took about 60-90 seconds.
I really need to get a probe in there to read bean temp. My initial ramps are far too slow.
 
seedlings
seehad, regarding your initial heat... You and I have read threads about profiles for the genecafe and the hottop. We are probably using about twice the amount of beans as they are, so, yes, your initial heat will need to be higher than you expect. Start with your heatgun on "10" and leave it there until you get 1st and second. Then, adjust down/up from there.

CHAD
Roaster: CoffeeAir II 2# DIY air roaster
Grinder: Vintage Grindmaster 500
Brewers: Vintage Cory DCU DCL, Aeropress, Press, Osaka Titanium pourover
 
David

Quote

seehad wrote:We are in business!! I'll put a switch on eventually but for now i've got some actual roasting to do.


seehad, You go, Dude! :Clap:

I love your telling the tale of your discoveries. I hope you will keep us posted on your continuing successes. Bread machines rule!
 
PeteH

Quote

seehad wrote:

After weighing out my first blend I went to work starting the heatgun on setting 7 while the bread machine warmed up. Once the motor was continuous I tossed in the beans. 6.5 minutes later the bread machine decided to go back into intermittent mode and finally stopped spinning altogether. That lead me to this thread where I tried to make sense of rewiring it at midnight.


I think you would want your heat gun putting out the most heat to begin with then cut it back later in the roast. I start cutting mine back when the roast reaches about 390 then let it coast into FC which makes it easier to extend the time between FC and SC.

I put in a separate switch for the built in heating element in the BM and use it to preheat the bread pan and partway through the roast, that way you don't have the cold metal pulling the heat from your beans. Since I started using the BM heating element I can consistently roast 1.5# to FC in 12 minutes or under. I could probably do 2# in 15 minutes.

I recently started using a Kill A Watt meter during roasting using the wattage setting. Once I get into FC I cut the HG back to about 900 watts. It's a great way to know how much heat you are putting out.

Glad to see another HG/BM roaster, it's the biggest bang for the buck.

Remember, never pass up another BM at the Thrift Store :)
Pete
 
seedlings
seehad, is this your heatgun?

http://www.harbor...mber=97114

CHAD
seedlings attached the following image:
heatgun.jpg

Edited by seedlings on 03/03/2009 10:51 AM
Roaster: CoffeeAir II 2# DIY air roaster
Grinder: Vintage Grindmaster 500
Brewers: Vintage Cory DCU DCL, Aeropress, Press, Osaka Titanium pourover
 
seehad
That's the one.
 
seehad
Last night I roasted a bunch of coffee. I started on the highest setting and even pre-heated for about 3-5 minutes. For 1.5# first crack came at 15 mins. For a pound it takes 12 minutes. Then depending on the profile i get 2nd crack 4-5 mins later.
Apparently I'm not letting enough heat escape in the later stages. The plastic lid is starting to melt around the hole the heat gun goes in.

I still need to shorten this several minutes. I saw an old school breadmaker at the thrift store that is completely round and huge with a thick glass lid. If I could find a way to cut a hole for the heat gun. The motor was really loud so i think i can talk the thrift store into coming down on the high $8 price tag.
 
brodystylez
I was wondering if I could get some help on this topic. I have already destroyed one bread maker and purchased another today, but am going down a similar path. I have stripped the machine down to just the dc motor, capacitor, and wiring, but don't know how to connect them. I have attached photos in hopes that some kind soul will come to my aid so that I may roast without manually stirring like I have been for the last month. The motor has only two wires, red and blue, and the capacitor has one white wire, and one red wire, as well as one green and one brown wire on the opposite side. As to how they work in conjunction with one another, I do not know. Hopefully someone here can provide some insight. My brother just graduated with a degree in electrical engineering, but is worthless when it comes to things like this, so homeroasters is my only other option. Thanks in advance!
s1023.photobucket.com/albums/af353/bengblac/?action=view&current=014.jpg Motor
s1023.photobucket.com/albums/af353/bengblac/?action=view&current=018.jpg and capacitor
Edited by brodystylez on 07/20/2009 4:15 PM
 
bvwelch
Greetings Brodystylez -- Please try again to provide photos -- so far, I can't see them. Also, if you could find the make/model of the Breadmaker, that may be helpful. One last thing-- where are you located? USA, Europe, other? -bill
 
brodystylez
Thanks so much for responding! The motor itself was just like Tom957's from the previous page that he said he killed. I tried to post a like to the pictures I took in photobucket, but I don't know how useful they are. The bread machine is a Sunbeam model 5833, but most of the components are identical to my last roaster/bm of a different brand. I am in the Florida in the US. As on the side of the motor it says DC 110v. I have limited experience dealing with electricity, but I am sure this can be done.
Here is a picture of the capacitor
i1023.photobucket.com/albums/af353/bengblac/018.jpg
 
David

Quote

brodystylez wrote:Here is a picture of the capacitor

Um, maybe it's me, but that's looking like a voltage-dropping transformer that provides power to the printed circuit board.

You want something similar, but without the small wires. Probably rectangular and black.
Edited by David on 07/20/2009 11:01 PM
 
bvwelch
Yes, that is a transformer. I must admit that in the half-dozen or so breadmachines that I've modified, I've never seen a setup like yours. My machines have all looked pretty much like David's, and the small transformer was just to supply a low voltage to the circuit board, and I disabled all of that for my machines.

By the way, the problem with the photos was on my end-- I was experimenting with OpenDNS and had 'photobucket' blocked. Sorry about that. -bill
 
brodystylez
Thanks for the replies. I feel like I am at least making progress and learning valuable life skills in the process. I think part of the photo issue was that I hadn't adjusted the pixel count in my first two images. Anyhow, the first machine that I destroyed had a small black rectangular box that was clearly the capacitor in question, while this one is a little more mystifying. The only other electronic components are part of the circuit board. There are two black boxes on it, one labeled for the heating elements and one for the motor, but I am not sure if it is the component that I need. The other motor had a small, black, rectangular piece in a similar position in the 'river' as where the transformer from my previous post was, and there was no doubt that it was the correct component, but I cut the wires too close and was unable to salvage it. It was in the exact same position this transformer, only this one (from my last post) had a ground and an additional brown wire, but it is of little importance at this point.

Here is a picture of the circuit board.

i1023.photobucket.com/albums/af353/bengblac/003.jpg

And here is a picture of what the only component that fits into the small, black, and rectangular category, and has a label relating to the motor, however I do not suspect that it is what I need, but if experience has taught me anything it is that my assumptions are incorrect.

i1023.photobucket.com/albums/af353/bengblac/004.jpg

I should note that I used a transformer (from speakes or a cell phone charger, I forget) on my other motor, which enables it to function, but the voltage/amperage was incorrect and it stops with the slightest resistance(mechanical). I think if I could find one with the correct volts/amps, it would solve my problems, but I've had no luck so far. Once again I appreciate your help and hope to not have to manually stir my roasts anymore, it is really quite a pain.
 
brodystylez
Also, here is a picture of the motor's labeling. I know there is a way to make it work, I just don't understand how right now. Thanks again.

i1023.photobucket.com/albums/af353/bengblac/005.jpg
 
bvwelch
Your latest 'black object' looks like a Relay.

However, If this breadmachine has a 'dough' cycle, it make work fine without any mods. Have you tried it?

Getting back to the motor-- a little google-ing of part number BOM-ZDM-25 does indeed seem to indicate this is a DC motor operating at 110 to 230 volts DC... I think it is theoretically possible to bypass most of the controls and 'hot wire' the motor to the DC supply, but I am concerned for your safety -- these are lethal voltages and currents!

I really think the best idea might be to try again -- this time look for a really really old breadmaker -- choose a heavy one, and hope it has an AC motor like David's example. -bill
 
brodystylez
Thanks for your help! I fear that the time for using the stock setup has come and gone, but I am a regular at the local thrift shops and buy any and all bread machines that I come across. I have some spare motors that function properly and may give one of them a go. Thanks again.
 
somegeek
Joined this forum just to say thanks for posting these diagrams. They got me going in the right direction. My machine conversion is nearly done. :)

somegeek
somegeek attached the following image:
somegeek_coffee_roasting_small.jpg

Edited by somegeek on 11/17/2009 12:53 AM
 
David

Quote

somegeek wrote: Joined this forum just to say thanks for posting these diagrams. They got me going in the right direction. My machine conversion is nearly done. :) somegeek

That machine is gorgeous (as bread machines go). Good pick! ThumbsUp

I especially like the fact that the motor is below the deck.
That will give you a lot of flexibility is designing the roasting vessel.

Please keep us posted on your progress.
 
seedlings
Ditto, great work!

I notice that on my breadmakers the belt between the motor pulley and the stirrer pulley get's a little elongated from the heat. If breadmakers weren't so cheap, or if I were getting fancy, like you have, I'd buy a better belt or allow for cooling underneath.

CHAD
Edited by seedlings on 11/17/2009 8:29 PM
Roaster: CoffeeAir II 2# DIY air roaster
Grinder: Vintage Grindmaster 500
Brewers: Vintage Cory DCU DCL, Aeropress, Press, Osaka Titanium pourover
 
somegeek
How many watts do these motors draw when moving the coffee beans around? Half way pondering installing a dimmer so smaller batches don't get tossed out... though my test run tonight was only using 6 ounces of roasted beans. Imagine when I get a full 1lb 3oz in there the agitator will have less oomph and won't kick out so many beans?

I had to reduce the size of my agitator(think that is what it's called?) to a short length of 3/16" music wire(seemed like my original was a boat paddle). :P
Edited by somegeek on 11/18/2009 2:13 AM
 
bvwelch

Quote

seedlings wrote:
I notice that on my breadmakers the belt between the motor pulley and the stirrer pulley get's a little elongated from the heat. If breadmakers weren't so cheap, or if I were getting fancy, like you have, I'd buy a better belt or allow for cooling underneath.CHAD


I used to have a related problem-- the thermal fuse on the motor itself would shut-down in mid-roast, when doing back-to-back roasts in very warm weather. My quick and dirty solution was to increase the height of the rubber feet, such that I have extra clearance below the machine. On really hot days I blow a fan underneath. Works great! -bill
 
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