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TC4+ Arduino coffee roaster shield (TC4-compatible)
czeffy66
I am a bit hesitant on where to connect the PWM 2A AC Light Dimmer Module into TC4+. The seller of the PWM module suggest one of the PWM output of the arduiono. If using this what code modification I would need for Artisan?
Can I still use the DC+ and DC- outputs? As I understand that this is for self powerring of the DC FAN by attaching the DC power supply to VIN and GND.
The PWM module is power from the arduino 5V instead. Would it work in a way that I do not attache any DC power supply, but use still the DC+ connected PWM and the DC- to GND of the PWM module? Thanks.
 
renatoa
Assuming you're talking about the RobotDyn module dimmer...

You want the dimmer module to drive what ?

Anyway, no modification needed for Artisan to use this board.

The PWM module don't need any power, the Vcc pin can be left unconnected for TC4, it is provided for other Arduino projects.
The typical usage of this board is:
- Gnd pin to Ground of Arduino.
- ZCD pin to the Arduino gpio pin used for ZC detection
- PWM pin to the Arduino gpio pin used for OT1 or OT2, depends what is your intended usage. Don't use tc4 OT1/OT2 outputs, those are for driving a SSR !
DC+/- are dedicated outputs for the fan, don't try using them for this module board !!!

First, answer us the introductory question, what is the purpose you want for module ?
Edited by renatoa on 03/16/2021 2:16 AM
 
mg512
Assuming you're talking about the module from Tindie that only takes a PWM signal as input (and doesn't have a ZCD output), you would usually connect that to the IO3 header. That would then replace the DC OUT screw terminal. You could still use the DC OUT header, but it would always be at the same power level as the IO3 header, you can't control them separately. (If you do want the PWM AC dimmer board, and the DC OUT header, both separately controllable, you could use another PWM pin on the Arduino.)

If you just connect the PWM AC Dimmer board to the IO3 header, and have the Arduino connected via USB, you don't need a DC power supply. But DC OUT won't work then, of course.
 
czeffy66
I am sorry I wasn't detailed enough, but I didn't want to bother you with a lot of details. A few years back I bought a
https://www.mechatronics.com/products/ac-motorized-impellers/UF250APA/ impeller for building a coffee roast cooler, but I never made it.
I thought I could use it as a both blower (lower speed, connected to the roaster column) and cooler (higher speed, using the suction side) in a arduino controlled fluid roaster. I bought
https://www.tindie.com/products/bugrovs2012/pwm-ac-light-dimmer-module-50hz-60hz/ suggested in
https://www.instructables.com/Arduino-controlled-DIY-Coffee-Roaster/.
Looking back again, I noticed that there was an explanation to connect to IO3 in this, that I overlooked earlier. It is really nice on TCP4+ board that the IO3 is a 3 PIN connection (IO3, GND, 5V), so all the connection needed is in one place for the PWM board (VCC, PWM, GND). The order of the PINs needs to be changed though.
Thanks for your explanation.
 
renatoa
This motor is an induction type, thus neither of TC4 control methods is appropriate to control its speed.
You need a variable frequency converter. Known also as VFD (Variable Frequency Drive)
Edited by renatoa on 03/16/2021 3:31 AM
 
czeffy66

Quote

renatoa wrote:
You need a variable frequency converter. Known also as VFD (Variable Frequency Drive)


I wasn't aware of that. THX.
 
ACEMBL
I made exactly the same mistake, purchased a single phase blower and thought I could control it with a dimmer. Schoolboy error on my part.

Because it?s single phase you will need a special single to single phase VFD, ATO make one - I?m sure others are available. The majority of VFDs are single phase input but control three phase motors. I?m mid learning curve at the moment Shock
 
renatoa
Or, better go on the paved way... universal motors, as those used in most vac blowers, much easier to control with dimmers or TC4 PAC.
 
PrehistoricPerk
Wanted to share my SR540 TC4+ conversion. I'll create a separate thread as well.i.imgur.com/nbZBQIJ.jpg

i.imgur.com/r4SDRpa.jpeg
 
jordo_99
EDIT: I think I figured it out on my own just by digging through old posts (honestly didn't take that long)...assuming @timbarnes got his board working, I can just copy what he did: https://homeroast...post_74502


I ordered a TC4+ kit (shows v5 on the back) a few weeks ago and have a quick question on soldering the through-hole components. I believe I have everything in the right places except for the capacitors...which each have 3 holes to choose from but only 2 wires.

I can't tell which capacitor goes into which set of holes and which 2 of the 3 holes should be used. (picture is having issues getting attached)

i.imgur.com/wvrxXjW.jpg
jordo_99 attached the following image:
20220102_104454_1.jpg

Edited by jordo_99 on 01/02/2022 12:28 PM
 
timbarnes
Because capacitor sizes vary a lot, it's quite common to provide multiple holes. You will usually be able to tell which ones are wired together, and you pick any one of those for one side. The only other issue is to observe polarity, as these are electrolytic capacitors and need to be placed in the correct orientation so they don't explode :).
 
jordo_99
I got my roaster all wired up and everything is reading and controllable in Artisan but I'm running into a bit of an issue with the fan and heater controls.

...if the heater is running at all the minimum fan is 50%. I'm able to lower the fan duty to 30% and 40% via buttons I've made but it automatically bumps it back up to 50% within a second or two.

This minimum duty cycle of 50% for the fan is making is very difficult for me to roast since the ET maxes out around 250-300F.

I had run into this issue previously when roasting manually but had worked around it by choking the fan intake a bit...I would really prefer not to do that anymore as it's hard on the motor and just seems unnecessary since software is causing the issue here.

I'll keep digging around but has anyone run into this before?


...I guess at the end of the day I can always just remove control over the heater and run it at 100% power and control temps only via the fan--I'm just thinking that may make it harder to make fine adjustments to temperature when relying on a PID and background profile.

EDIT: I'm using the recommended PWM board if that matters at all:
https://www.amazo...B06Y1DT1WP
Edited by jordo_99 on 01/08/2022 10:30 PM
 
mg512

Quote

jordo_99 wrote:

I got my roaster all wired up and everything is reading and controllable in Artisan but I'm running into a bit of an issue with the fan and heater controls.

...if the heater is running at all the minimum fan is 50%. I'm able to lower the fan duty to 30% and 40% via buttons I've made but it automatically bumps it back up to 50% within a second or two.

This minimum duty cycle of 50% for the fan is making is very difficult for me to roast since the ET maxes out around 250-300F.

I had run into this issue previously when roasting manually but had worked around it by choking the fan intake a bit...I would really prefer not to do that anymore as it's hard on the motor and just seems unnecessary since software is causing the issue here.

I'll keep digging around but has anyone run into this before?


...I guess at the end of the day I can always just remove control over the heater and run it at 100% power and control temps only via the fan--I'm just thinking that may make it harder to make fine adjustments to temperature when relying on a PID and background profile.

EDIT: I'm using the recommended PWM board if that matters at all:
https://www.amazo...B06Y1DT1WP


Heya, I think I already replied to you via email on this, but for anyone else running into this: This is something I enabled in the pre-configured Arduino controllers I make available on Tindie and my website, as a very basic safety feature. To disable it, just re-flash the aArtisan or aArtisanQ_PID version and configuration of your choice. Or shoot me an email and I can walk you through changing the 50% to some other value (it's also mentioned somewhere in the manual I think).
 
renatoa
Also, if with 50% you have too much lift, then there is a design issue in your setup, imo.
Overpowered fan I mean.
Sure, is too late to change something, but if you arrive with the fan in the 25% realm, then you could have bad surprises of wild speed variations, that also translates into hot air changes, uncontrollable.
On a recent chinese SR clone I modded recently the working range of fan through a roast was 60-70%, as an example.
 
mg512

Quote

renatoa wrote:

Also, if with 50% you have too much lift, then there is a design issue in your setup, imo.
Overpowered fan I mean.
Sure, is too late to change something, but if you arrive with the fan in the 25% realm, then you could have bad surprises of wild speed variations, that also translates into hot air changes, uncontrollable.
On a recent chinese SR clone I modded recently the working range of fan through a roast was 60-70%, as an example.


That's also a good point! With a DC fan I would just recommend using a slightly lower voltage PSU, with an AC fan there isn't anything that easy of course. You could add more beans!
 
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