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My first popcorn popper
renatoa
No need to repeat the Gene mantra as a reference machine... it don't worth the money, indeed. But there are really much cheaper ways to get better results.
Already advised you in the first page how to improve your popper with less than $20.
But this imply also learning, which seems to be an issue for you.
Learning, and also taste education. Obtaining results "like a commercial" isn't the best bragging in this field, imo. All home users from my community started roasting at home because they no more like the commercial coffee. None of them returned to a coffee shop to buy another bag. Two of them became world roasting champions, so go figure we have a competent community to talk on this subject...
 
Luposian

Quote

renatoa wrote:

No need to repeat the Gene mantra as a reference machine... it don't worth the money, indeed. But there are really much cheaper ways to get better results.
Already advised you in the first page how to improve your popper with less than $20.
But this imply also learning, which seems to be an issue for you.
Learning, and also taste education. Obtaining results "like a commercial" isn't the best bragging in this field, imo. All home users from my community started roasting at home because they no more like the commercial coffee. None of them returned to a coffee shop to buy another bag. Two of them became world roasting champions, so go figure we have a competent community to talk on this subject...

I only use the Gene Cafe as a reference, because it, to me, is the "best" unit I could get, for the amount of money I'm willing to spend. It also seems the most unique, in it's drum design and overall execution.

I don't like coffee enough to become obsessed with it. It's a "fun" beverage to have twice a day. But not something I write memes about... "Touch my coffee and you die!" kinda thing. From what I have read, it seems as though you cannot get all aspects of coffee in one roast. You can have "this" aspect, but not "that" one. You can have "these" qualities, but not "those" tastes.

In other words, of all the different aspects (flavors or qualities) of a coffee roast, "you cannot have your cake and eat it, too". You must pick and choose what you want or prefer. And, in that, it's suddenly the same situation as with brewing espresso. It's what YOU like. There is no ONE right way to do it. You do what YOU like... and THAT becomes your definition of "perfection".

And, to those of us who haven't got but the barest glimmer of what is "a good espresso" or "a good roasted coffee", maybe we are the most blessed of all, because our bar of expection is set so low, once we reach it, we're happy! I consider myself fortunate that I am able to duplicate (to my own pauper-level of taste comprehension) a taste that is virtuallly identical to what I've bought from our local roaster... what I call "lightly burned toast" (when a shot of espresso is mixed with a pat of melted butter in a shot glass). Once I matched that taste... I knew I could stop seeking and be perfectly content with my machine... as primitive as it is...
"I got me a Coffee Popper! Whoo-hoo!"
 
allenb
Hi Luposian, with coffee, as you know by now, there's 10,000 ways to get your green to cup and 1,000,000 variations within the 10,000.

Try this or that method or machine as you find you would like to try but above all else, have fun doing it and keep us in the loop regardless of what direction you go. I still use a ceramic seed roaster from time to time just to keep my senses tied to the bean and really smell and feel the process. Sometimes my bigger drum roaster separates me from what got me interested in roasting coffee in the first place.

Have a blast making good coffee! BBQ grill
1/2 lb and 1 lb drum, Siemens Sirocco fluidbed, presspot, chemex, cajun biggin brewer from the backwoods of Louisiana
 
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