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11/26/2020 6:37 AM
Everyone have a super Thanksgiving and may all your roasts turn out stellar woohoo

11/25/2020 4:20 PM
Howdy 1st CH and welcome to HR forum! Be sure to read in the forums to see if anything covers the topic and please post away in drum roaster forums Welcome

11/25/2020 3:35 PM
Hey everyone! I am new to the home roasters forum. Mainly here to read and learn! I’d also love to get advice about modifying my roaster (a Huky 500)

11/10/2020 5:29 PM
Welcome MJ, post away! Cheers

11/08/2020 6:05 PM
Hello All, New here, started with an air popper, now using fresh roast 800. I'm here to learn and connect with others Thank you

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Fluidbed Roaster project
cdrake39

Quote

JackH wrote:

He did a nice job documenting that project!


I agree! Not sure if he is a member on this forum or not - but I'll mention it to him
cdrake39
So I'm beginning to wonder if my issue with 'spouting' of the beans is more so related to the shape of my reducer? The steep vertical edges and nearly flat bottom may not be conducive to lofting the beans. I could order a conical reducer (like many others have used), or maybe tack weld an appropriately sized funnel inside the bowl reducer. I guess before I go down that road, do you folks think it may provide a significant improvement?
cdrake39 attached the following image:
bowl_reducer_rev.jpg
Vitreous
Maybe post a video so we can see what its doing?
cdrake39

Quote

Vitreous wrote:

Maybe post a video so we can see what its doing?


Just posted a short video on YT. The spouting seems minimal which is my main concern. The fan power should be sufficient as it was used in another build (referenced a couple posts back) and capable of spouting 250g. So I assume the issue lies with the airflow in my particular setup? Maybe caused by a combination of things (heating element blocking adequate airflow, bowl reducer geometry not "funneling" beans to center, or air flow too high and static pressure not sufficient). Appreciate any feedback you may have!



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pJOSb...JOSbQFh4zE
Edited by JackH on 04/28/2020 4:23 AM
CharcoalRoaster
Maybe not enough bean mass to get 100% circulation of the spouting bed?
cdrake39

Quote

CharcoalRoaster wrote:

Maybe not enough bean mass to get 100% circulation of the spouting bed?


Not enough? Or too much? I can try 250g this evening to see how it looks!
CharcoalRoaster
I was thinking not enough because there's not enough weight of the mass to replace the beans being fluidized. Then again, I'm not scientist or engineer just a serial DIYer lol
CK
I'm pretty sure you'll have to get a conical reducer as jbrux4 uses. Without that type of reducer, there will likely be dead spots not circulating the beans on the bottom edges/corners of your roast chamber.
cdrake39

Quote

CK wrote:

I'm pretty sure you'll have to get a conical reducer as jbrux4 uses. Without that type of reducer, there will likely be dead spots not circulating the beans on the bottom edges/corners of your roast chamber.


Yeah, I was thinking that may be an issue. My plan is to 3D print a conical reducer to test that theory (without the heating element wired in of course). If it proves successful, I'll either opt for the tri clamp style reducer, or weld a stainless steel funnel inside the bowl reducer to achieve the same effect. Thanks for the advice!
cdrake39
I 3D printed a conical reducer to test whether or not that would improve the agitation of beans. Seems like a minimal improvement, but it's difficult to tell. See video link below:



The specs of my blower are 7kPa (20"H2O) static pressure and about 28 CFM airflow. Perhaps this just isn't sufficient? Or maybe I'm overthinking it and expecting too much agitation lol
pisanoal
I think it looks like there are less dead spots in the video with the conical insert.

I'd say that is probably sufficient for the beginning of the roast. It should get a lot better as the roast progresses.
Husamka
I need your advice, which of these attached RCs design is better for beans circulation for 500-700gr capacity?
Husamka attached the following images:
61-wxind2l_ac_sl1500_.jpg 61b3pfcoqcl_ac_sx679_.jpg
CharcoalRoaster
The one on the left (first). The bowl shape might have dead spots when it drops into that little section on the other one.
Husamka
CharcoalRoaster, Thank you. I was thinking the right one has more capacity but still smooth circulation is more important.
Edited by Husamka on 05/07/2020 12:20 AM
cdrake39
Well, I'm finally back to working on the roaster and almost ready to fire it up. Before I do so, I have a few question regarding wiring that I would like to run by you folks first (not an electrician, so I have a cautious fear of DIY wiring). If anything in the wiring photo stands out as an issue, please let me know. Just bought a new house and would prefer not to start any fires :p All connections will be covered with heat shrink when finalized
For context:
12VDC Blower motor is controlled with the driver, with an approx power rating of 200W
Arduino will be powered via USB from laptop
Heating element is 1740W @ 120V (14.5A)
All wiring is 12 AWG
Heating element tube has a layer of mica, and the thermal fuse is wired in series with the hot wire
The 3 white dots are where the main AC power cord connects
The GND wires connected with the screw will be bolted to the enclosure
The stray wires coming off the DC driver won't be needed for TC4+ control
Should I wire an inline fuse? Or an on/off rocker switch?
cdrake39 attached the following image:
20200924_113432_resized.jpg

Edited by cdrake39 on 09/24/2020 12:44 PM
jessep

Quote

cdrake39 wrote:

Should I wire an inline fuse? Or an on/off rocker switch?


You could stick a circuit breaker in there at the AC side just to make sure nothing happens, or just rely on the house breaker :)

Looks good to me. I also grounded all the metal parts so if the element burns up or a wire gets lose and manages to find it's way out of the element/mica and touch the housing it should blow the breaker before doing too much welding.

I currently rely on the relay to be my on/off switch and leave the AC plugged into the machine. As long as the USB is disconnected, it "should" stay disabled. I feel like a physical switch could add another level of safety and also a physical "kill" switch if the controller get's a bit too aggressive.
allenb

Quote


I currently rely on the relay to be my on/off switch and leave the AC plugged into the machine. As long as the USB is disconnected, it "should" stay disabled. I feel like a physical switch could add another level of safety and also a physical "kill" switch if the controller get's a bit too aggressive.


A physical, manual kill switch for the heating element is a must on any roaster where there is any chance of air flow failure regardless of software hi limit controls. Many have had good luck with their electronics keeping the roaster safe but there always seems to be that 1 out of X that destroys the whole works.
1/2 lb and 1 lb drum, Siemens Sirocco fluidbed, presspot, chemex, cajun biggin brewer from the backwoods of Louisiana
jkoll42

Quote

allenb wrote:

Quote


I currently rely on the relay to be my on/off switch and leave the AC plugged into the machine. As long as the USB is disconnected, it "should" stay disabled. I feel like a physical switch could add another level of safety and also a physical "kill" switch if the controller get's a bit too aggressive.


A physical, manual kill switch for the heating element is a must on any roaster where there is any chance of air flow failure regardless of software hi limit controls. Many have had good luck with their electronics keeping the roaster safe but there always seems to be that 1 out of X that destroys the whole works.


I'll second Allen on this. If you can run an inline switch to the element only it would keep airflow but the easiest is just to run the entire setup off a power strip that has an on/off switch assuming you are under a standard wall outlet load like 15A in the US. Also with any roast setup keep a fire extinguisher close. It doesn't even have to be a large canister although that's what I keep around for my gas setup.
-Jon
Honey badger 1k, Bunn LPG-2E, Technivorm, Cimbali Max Hybrid, Vibiemme Double Domo V3
cdrake39
Greatly appreciate the feedback everyone! I will add in the kill switch (and use a power bar with a switch in the meantime) and keep a small extinguisher on hand just in case.

Would you say there are any issues with how the hot/neutral wires for the heating element are run through the DC PSU? The AC Main wires split when they come in (using a T Tap splice), one end going to the DC PSU and the other end going to the heating element. I assume the DC PSU won't see any loads higher than what the blower motor connected to it is drawing? (ie 200W). The white dots represent where the AC Mains are connected
jkoll42

Quote

cdrake39 wrote:

Greatly appreciate the feedback everyone! I will add in the kill switch (and use a power bar with a switch in the meantime) and keep a small extinguisher on hand just in case.

Would you say there are any issues with how the hot/neutral wires for the heating element are run through the DC PSU? The AC Main wires split when they come in (using a T Tap splice), one end going to the DC PSU and the other end going to the heating element. I assume the DC PSU won't see any loads higher than what the blower motor connected to it is drawing? (ie 200W). The white dots represent where the AC Mains are connected


The only thing I see that I really don't like is the T splices. I would be OK with having them temporarily to verify everything is working correctly but inline splices tend to be unreliable and are not efficient. Soldering up a T splice is quite easy

Jump to 6:29 for a T splice solder example


-Jon
Honey badger 1k, Bunn LPG-2E, Technivorm, Cimbali Max Hybrid, Vibiemme Double Domo V3
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