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11/26/2020 6:37 AM
Everyone have a super Thanksgiving and may all your roasts turn out stellar woohoo

11/25/2020 4:20 PM
Howdy 1st CH and welcome to HR forum! Be sure to read in the forums to see if anything covers the topic and please post away in drum roaster forums Welcome

11/25/2020 3:35 PM
Hey everyone! I am new to the home roasters forum. Mainly here to read and learn! I’d also love to get advice about modifying my roaster (a Huky 500)

11/10/2020 5:29 PM
Welcome MJ, post away! Cheers

11/08/2020 6:05 PM
Hello All, New here, started with an air popper, now using fresh roast 800. I'm here to learn and connect with others Thank you

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Coffee bloom and degassing
Boki
Please forgive me if this is too basic of a question. I am fairly new to the world of home roasting. I roast the coffee and store it in a mason jar for 24 hours before I brew using an aeropress. Often there is a loud pop opening the mason jar. I assume that is degassing of CO2. When I add the hot water to the ground coffee, I see the bubbling and assume that is what is called the coffee bloom. Now is the coffee bloom just more CO2? Or is it something else?

Still trying to figure out what is going on...
renatoa
Yes, it's degassing, mainly CO2.
As usual, nothing is wrong with this, if not exceeding a certain measure, not enough or too much.
You should wait a minimal time before brew, until enough gas is gone, else you can experience uneven extraction, due to small bubbles / air pockets, that can disrupt the contact between the coffee grounds and the water.
Conversely, too much wait, the flavours are less vibrant.
The trick is to allow it to degas sufficiently, without allowing the beans to become stale.

Storing in any hermetical jar is not good, not allowing the proper degassing.
You should use any storage solution fitted with a gas escape valve, either a bag, either solid matter, but allowing gas to escape as it is released, and not allowing oxygen replacing, because will accelerate beans oxidisation.
For me, as pound weekly home roaster, the valve bags are the most effective solution.
Others mileage may vary.
Also, please notice the vacuum solutions aren't good too, because increase forcefully the flavors extraction from the beans.

An academic approach on this subject below Grin
https://pubs.acs.org/doi/full/10.1021...c.7b03310#
allenb
I've been using mason jars with standard lid for years and is one of the best and easiest to use. When you screw down the lid, barely tighten it so the jar will build little pressure and can easily degas. Fortunately, the jar won't ever pull ambient atmosphere back in as there is always some generation of gas even a couple of weeks after roasting.

One way valves are unnecessary.
1/2 lb and 1 lb drum, Siemens Sirocco fluidbed, presspot, chemex, cajun biggin brewer from the backwoods of Louisiana
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