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allenb
12/01/2022 11:20 AM
temkhabana Welcome

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12/01/2022 3:54 AM
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Expectations
downstairscoffee
My Behmor arrived, and I did my first two roasts yesterday. I've spent the last week watching YouTube videos on roasting with the Behmor, but in spite of this, discovered that I had learned virtually nothing, and really stumbled my way through the first roast. It went too long, too cool, and ended up being way too light. I learned a ton from that experience alone, to make my second roast pretty decent. I tend to like medium-dark roasts, and the second one, not only met my desired hit times for the three stages almost perfectly, it also ended a decent colour.

Anyway, I couldn't wait a full day even, to try the first roast. I wanted to know if it was going straight in the garbage. So after 20hrs, I brewed my first espresso with my first roast. First grind is always a bit of an experiment for me, and this went through my espresso machine much too quickly. So, all in all, first roast was an absolute disaster, and first brew was an absolute disaster. How is it then, that this is the most delicious light roast coffee I've ever tasted? LOL.

Definitely not throwing this in the garbage, and will likely even keep the recipe. While I don't normally drink light roast, it's really good. A totally different drink to what I'm used to, but absolutely delicious.

Maybe my expectations are too low??? Grin
--
Behmor 2000AB
Baratza Sette 270
Gaggia Classic Pro
 
renatoa
Welcome !

Maybe you should learn to love alternative ways of extraction together with espresso Grin
Light roasts shows their full potential when prepared using a whatever pour over method.
 
downstairscoffee
Yeah, I tried pour over once, but found the coffee (the same beans that were awesome as espresso) to be really acidic in the stomach, and the taste to be really bland. I had grind settings text book perfect (coincidence, not skill) to have it run through in perfect time, but I dunno. Just not a good cup of coffee in any way shape or form. I experimented for a couple of weeks, then asked myself - why am I doing this? I love espresso. But I could try it with a light roast...

Also interesting - we have a local roaster (the most commercial one here) whose "espresso roast" is a light roast. They do dark roasts, so its not like they don't know how. LOL.
--
Behmor 2000AB
Baratza Sette 270
Gaggia Classic Pro
 
HarryDog
I drink mostly espresso and long blacks but I like a good pour over.
For V60 I use the Tetsu 4-6 method, 3 pours on the end gives you much more extraction over the two pours but still not espresso of course.

I have been doing some testing with the Breville precision brewer just to test how other people brew as I'm going to send out some gifts soon and want to know what it will be like. Even my bad cups were better than the bagged stuff I have but it's a little older so not a fair fight.

I have tried my roasts from 4 hours to 9 days rest. The only one I liked right away was Guatemalan and at 9 days I really enjoyed the Ethiopian Mocha.
 
downstairscoffee
Tried pourover tonight with my disaster roast (it's a Bodum - bought it because it was the cheapest way to get into pourover, with a permanent filter... not known for its quality).

The same coffee was really excellent. A slight acid feeling in the stomach afterwards, but nothing compared to the pourover I'd previously experienced.

I guess next on the wish list will be another grinder (its a bit of a hassle with the Sette to have two very different settings on the go, even though it does have a minimal retention), gooseneck kettle and possibly a better pourover device.
--
Behmor 2000AB
Baratza Sette 270
Gaggia Classic Pro
 
HarryDog
I picked up a one liter bonavita on sale and love it. Only annoying thing is pushing hold when you put the kettle back on the stand. I still use my melitta sometimes as it uses the same paper filters as the breville.

I have had some blends that I don't like brewed using steel or the mesh baskets and they can be nasty, wonder if you try a paper filter you see any difference, good or bad?
 
Birdman
The Behmor tends to get a bad rap. I've been using a Behmor for many years now. I tend to prefer city+ to full city roasts, but that's just me.
It takes a little bit of time to get the hang of it, so don't sweat it. You're well on your way .
You didn't say what beans you were roasting.
Edited by Birdman on 11/24/2022 9:38 AM
 
downstairscoffee
Yeah, I feel a little more in control now (I've done 14 roasts), but forever in search of the perfect (for me) taste, I'm trying a lot of different beans (all from the same reputable seller though). I'm keeping track of everything, and have done a few good roasts of Brazilian Santos, Monsooned Malabar and Papua New Guinea.

Those first roasts that turned out so well were PNG, but done as 4oz batches, so I need to figure out the best way to scale up to a half pound, and keep the same great results. I'm doing all half pound batches now.

Last batch was Guatamalan Antigua. I burnt the first batch of those... the second batch turned out with almost perfectly what I planned for (med-dark, 50% dry, 30% brown, 20% development) but I have yet to taste it (it's only day 3 today).

Roasting for espresso is giving me a couple of frustrations - having to wait five or six days to try it, and the difficulty in mastering the espresso process in itself. The process has unwrapped a couple of previous mysteries though - like how different beans require such massively different grind settings, but I've been finding that roasting small batches means that I get pretty much to the end of a batch before I've mastered the right grind settings and precise extraction times for a great taste (except by coincidence). I'm getting better at guessing a grind start point though. And roasting half pound batches is helping a lot in lots of ways.
--
Behmor 2000AB
Baratza Sette 270
Gaggia Classic Pro
 
HarryDog
I'm finding a longer rest has made many more beans palatable to me. I just did 2 Colombian roasts and I had this green chemical note to it, at 11 days its improved. It's sold as organic but not sure that is exactly true. Maybe I roasted a bit long at 10.5 minutes? Will try a shorter roast next time.
 
Birdman
I usually do a pound at a time, one of the advantages of the Behmore. I found it easier. Most of the beans I roast are OK over night, Yemen beans are an exception. Occasionally others pop up that need a longer rest. A lot of this is personal preference. You can also open the door during the cooling step. This will cool the beans down faster, and slightly change the profile towards more brightness. Lately I haven't bothered though.
 
downstairscoffee

Quote

Birdman wrote:

Most of the beans I roast are OK over night,


For espresso?

My experience is that they're insanely gassy until day four or so. Over an inch of bitter crema (I speak from experience)? No thanks. Grin

Now that I have a bit of reserve of roasted beans built up, waiting for five days is not a problem from a drinking perspective. It's only a problem from the perspective of my inquisitiveness in finding out whether the batch is decent or not. Everything is new right now, so not a single batch has been done to the same recipe as a previous one.
--
Behmor 2000AB
Baratza Sette 270
Gaggia Classic Pro
 
Birdman

Quote

downstairscoffee wrote:

Quote

Birdman wrote:

Most of the beans I roast are OK over night,


For espresso?

My experience is that they're insanely gassy until day four or so. Over an inch of bitter crema (I speak from experience)? No thanks. Grin

Now that I have a bit of reserve of roasted beans built up, waiting for five days is not a problem from a drinking perspective. It's only a problem from the perspective of my inquisitiveness in finding out whether the batch is decent or not. Everything is new right now, so not a single batch has been done to the same recipe as a previous one.


No, not espresso.
 
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