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Discussion On Resting The Bean.
Kaffee Bitte
This is a topic that doesn't come up often on this forum, so I thought I would start up a thread about it.

How long do you rest your coffee after it's roasted? Do you drink it right out of the roaster or do you let it breath a bit?

Do you rest the coffee differently for different brewing methods?
Lynn

"Some days it's spice, other days it's bitter dirt."
bjanis
I put mine in a mason jar with a lid that has a one way valve in it and let it go for 48 hours before pulling any espresso shot. Seems like right after roasting it is not good for at least that long.
Coffeenut
Lynn,

I've made coffee from just roasted beans many times and it's usually because I got behind in roasting and was plumb out. Some coffees are really not bad as a fresh roast/fresh brew (drip not espresso). Espresso really highlights a coffee that isn't developed enough, so I usually make sure it's rested enough for espresso. I've found coffees that can be brewed right after roasting to be the same coffees that typically require very little rest (24hrs or less). When I do use beans directly from roasting, I allow them to rest at least 30 mins open air. In just that small amount of time they have started to outgas and develop that wonderful coffee smell.

Most times I'm prepared and am roasting a couple days before I will run out. Some coffees (as I'm sure you know) require greater rest than others. If the coffee is a Central American, Mexican, South American or any other coffee that develops faster, I willl rest it as little as 12hrs to as much as 24hrs. For Hawaii Kona, it's 3 days minimum or it's just too "green tasting" for me. For many of the African coffees I'll allow 2-3 days rest. I like India Mysore Nuggets with only 24hrs rest, but if I blend it with Monsooned Malabar and a little Indian Robusta, that rest period is better at 2-3 days.

It's really a pretty variable thing (the rest period). I've had some coffees that reached their peak flavor in two days and are declining thereafter. It may be just my imagination (cause I have no scientific evidence), but I also feel the darker I roast some coffees it reduces the rest period by a day or so.

It's an interesting topic and I look forward to what others have experienced.

Rick
Kaffee Bitte
My rest period is higly variable. I am mostly an espresso drinker, though I do drink french press on occasion.

I found in the past when I was using an air roaster that 48 hours was about right for most coffees to go towards espresso. Now that I am using a drum roaster almost exclusively my rest has evolved into a rather complex process.

The standard 48 hours isn't enough time for most of the coffees I am using. Part of the rest schedule I have worked up has to do with the level of roast. Light roasts get a minimum of 4 days rest before hitting the grinder. Anything before then and the spro just doesn't taste right. Medium roasts are more like 3 days. Dark roasts (which I rarely do for espresso for myself) get no more than 2 days and usually have peaked within 4-5. This is part of the reason I don't use dark roast for my machine much. Plus my machine isn't very temp stable, so dark roasts tend to extract at too high of a temperature, and taste very bitter.

Another factor that I take into account is the origin of the coffee or coffees and what process they are. For dry process coffees I like to rest them for at least 4 days, usually heading into 5-6. For Yemens and Ethiopian DPs it is often even longer. I once set aside a Yemen for 13 days because I had over roasted. When I did get to it it was amazing. Couldn't even believe it tasted better than usual! Now Yemens get 7-10 days. Most Centrals are around 2-3 days. South Amercians depend on where they come from. DP brazils and blends using them are standard 4-5 days. Most of the other South's get 2-3
Indonesians though, are coffees that still through me for loops. They are rather variable to begin with I think.

Anyway. That is a brief view of my resting procedures.
Lynn

"Some days it's spice, other days it's bitter dirt."
seedlings
Since I'm a small scale (myself and my wife) roaster, I roast one origin, and have it for each of the next 5 or 6 days, then roast again, so, perhaps I have the best of both worlds. Sorry I'm not so technical, but as soon as I get into technicalities, my obsessive-compulsive side kicks in and then I end up going all or nothing, so I just roast and sip.

However, now that espresso is approaching the menu, I am more interested in this topic, so I will read and learn!

Thanks for the thread!
CHAD
Roaster: CoffeeAir II 2# DIY air roaster
Grinder: Vintage Grindmaster 500
Brewers: Vintage Cory DCU DCL, Aeropress, Press, Osaka Titanium pourover
Coffeenut
Chad,

That's one of the beauties of home roasting...you can be as technical or non-technical as you see fit. With espresso on the horizon, your "OC" side will be in "hog heaven"...I know mine was, not to mention days of my head coming off my body from the caffeine overdoses of all the "shot testing". s:6

Rick
Kaffee Bitte
Ditto on the caffeine overload from shot testing. It's even worse when you are working up espresso blends for sale. I am ok with it not being just right for my personal use, but it better be damn good if I am selling it to someone.
Lynn

"Some days it's spice, other days it's bitter dirt."
seedlings
Shot testing... I got 3 in a row the other day (one in the morning, one in the afternoon, and one at night) before I ran out of that batch of beans. I was extatic! It seems I'm back to square one with this Guatamala... sinkers. Sinkers. Well, I've decided to put another American twist (baristardization?) to the beloved Italian tradition... here it is...
breaking all taboos and traditions....

don't read ahead if you are at all faint of heart...

seriously...


As soon as I detect a "sinker" developing (which is usually in about 5 seconds) I ... decide to .... dilute it in some hot water and drink it anyway! There, I said it. I knkow I'll never be barista material... but... waste coffee????? It's not an Americano, beacuse you make those with genuine espresso shots... so mine is the Americanito (little americano).

CHAD
Edited by seedlings on 01/10/2008 9:14 AM
Roaster: CoffeeAir II 2# DIY air roaster
Grinder: Vintage Grindmaster 500
Brewers: Vintage Cory DCU DCL, Aeropress, Press, Osaka Titanium pourover
Kaffee Bitte
Everyone pours sink shots Chad. Don't feel bad about it. Depending on the amount of time I have when making my coffee I will occasionally drink sink shots simply because I need the caffeine to be functional and human. What you are making sounds like my Minicanos. About equal parts hot water and spro.

You might be surprised by just how much a good rest will improve your espresso. Get a bit ahead on roasting! Coffees that are under 48 hours will be widely variable in grind and flavor in the cup. They also tend to flow a bit faster. Don't ask me why, but they seem to. A fully rested coffee will grind more consistently for espresso and should be easier to dial in.
Lynn

"Some days it's spice, other days it's bitter dirt."
seedlings

Quote

Kaffee Bitte wrote:
You might be surprised by just how much a good rest will improve your espresso. Get a bit ahead on roasting! Coffees that are under 48 hours will be widely variable in grind and flavor in the cup. They also tend to flow a bit faster. Don't ask me why, but they seem to. A fully rested coffee will grind more consistently for espresso and should be easier to dial in.


Well, that may explain the 2oz in 15 seconds this morning from the Sumatra I roasted last night. It was all foam, and after a couple of tiny (yucky) sips, it settled to about 1oz coffee and 1/2 oz crema. I went ahead and drank the rest real fast anyway. We'll see tomorrow morning with 36 hours rest. It is "resting" in the grinder hopper, so perhaps it will degass a little faster since I'm doing nothing to keep the oxygen out, right?

CHAD
Roaster: CoffeeAir II 2# DIY air roaster
Grinder: Vintage Grindmaster 500
Brewers: Vintage Cory DCU DCL, Aeropress, Press, Osaka Titanium pourover
Kaffee Bitte
While it is possible to kick a roast forward a little bit by what you are doing, the best results will be with a full 48 hours or more before use.
This is why I say to get a bit ahead on the roast and keep yourself there. Roast 2 days before you will run out and you will always have espresso ready and good.
Lynn

"Some days it's spice, other days it's bitter dirt."
emigre
Hi there, thought I'd jump in and ask:
Is it a must to have a one-way valve when resting your coffee? Because I usually just leave them in an air-tight container with no valve? Not sure if the outgassing affects the overall taste after the resting period.

Any thoughts greatly appreciated!
LPG Indirect Heat | 5kg Solid Drum Roaster | Beginner
JETROASTER
A mason jar with a slightly loose lid will allow beans to degass.... Then tighten up the lid after a few days.
Cheers, -Scott
John Despres
Resting and degassing are two different things.

While it's true degassing does occur during the rest period, it depends on how long you plan to rest your beans. Degassing is effectively over after about 48 hours. From there you're just resting the beans.

There are no rules as to how long you should rest your beans. That's up to you. However, there's great fun in resting & testing.

If you are unable to wait any time at all, roast several batches at one time, more than you would normally drink and brew a different batch each day making tasting notes as you go.

Some coffees will peak in flavor in a few days, while others like Yemen coffees taste spectacular after 10-14 days.

Just play and make notes.

And have fun.

John
Respect the bean.
John Despres
Fresh Roast 8, Gene Cafe, JYTT 1k, Quest M3, Mazzer Mini, Technivorm, various size presses and many more brewers.
Donut Dog
It's a real crap shoot...

depends on the bean, the roast and how you degas and rest them...

your palate is the largest player in this resting arena, try all sorts of different ways from jars, to paper bags.

I try every bean within minutes of a roast regardless of my desire for a cafe crema.
if nothing else I sip and toss but I get some idea of what's there...


beach
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Dan
My method is to dump the beans into a freezer ziploc bag right after cooling. I might burp the bag if it looks like it is about to explode! Then I rest and test over the next few days. Once I think the flavor has peaked, it goes into the freezer to halt the resting/staling process. That way, I can keep any number of roasted beans on hand without worrying about them going bad. This is a good way for me to do fewer roasts, enjoy more flavors, and save money, too. Like Fox and Schulman, I have not found any change in flavor from fresh and frozen beans.
1 pound electric sample roaster, 3 pound direct-flame roaster, both handmade; modified Mazzer Mini grinder, LaSpaziale Vivaldi II automatic espresso machine. When the electricity goes out I make vacpot coffee from beans ground on my Zassenhaus hand grinder, and heat the water with a teakettle on the gas range.
emigre
Resting and degassing are 2 different things??

I have always thought that these 2 go hand in hand and you can't really separate them from one another. I knew that degassing is a natural process when the beans release gas after the roast, which only occurs when you are resting them. I thought once the degassing period is over, we do not 'rest' them anymore as their quality starts to deteriorate.

Didn't know you can rest them again for up to 10?14 days.

Interesting.
LPG Indirect Heat | 5kg Solid Drum Roaster | Beginner
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