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1st try with bread machine and heat gun
bvwelch

Quote

seedlings wrote:

Bill, you're always wise to be a little skeptical, however I was not teasing...this time B) I'm pretty sure the drum roasters here get 12 to 15 minutes to first crack, sometimes longer if the roast is stopping at City (right after 1C is over). If at 7 minutes your beans are at 340F, that's on pace for a 10 minute first crack, right?

CHAD


Chad,

But that was without any beans at all. When I repeated the "low heat only" experiment, but this time, with a pound of beans, after three minutes, I was only at 150, so at that point, I decided that you were teasing, and flipped the switch to high. Maybe I will try it again and be more patient...

Bill
Edited by bvwelch on 04/23/2008 3:18 PM
 
seedlings
I'm posting a video on youtube. Stay tuned.

CHAD
Roaster: CoffeeAir II 2# DIY air roaster
Grinder: Vintage Grindmaster 500
Brewers: Vintage Cory DCU DCL, Aeropress, Press, Osaka Titanium pourover
 
boyntonstu

Quote

bvwelch wrote:

Quote

seedlings wrote:

Bill, you're always wise to be a little skeptical, however I was not teasing...this time B) I'm pretty sure the drum roasters here get 12 to 15 minutes to first crack, sometimes longer if the roast is stopping at City (right after 1C is over). If at 7 minutes your beans are at 340F, that's on pace for a 10 minute first crack, right?

CHAD


Chad,

But that was without any beans at all. When I repeated the "low heat only" experiment, but this time, with a pound of beans, after three minutes, I was only at 150, so at that point, I decided that you were teasing, and flipped the switch to high. Maybe I will try it again and be more patient...

Bill


Something is not right.:(

My empty BM on Hi is up to 300F in 1 minute.

Check your empty tub temp. at 1 minute.

BoyntonStu
 
seedlings
Ditto what Stu said. Something doesn't add up. You should definitely be able to roast to temperature on low, it'll take about twice as long.

Stupid youtube videos have to be under 10 minutes... I have to break it into two parts... still working...

CHAD
Roaster: CoffeeAir II 2# DIY air roaster
Grinder: Vintage Grindmaster 500
Brewers: Vintage Cory DCU DCL, Aeropress, Press, Osaka Titanium pourover
 
bvwelch
Greetings,

Thanks for the help, and interest. I do appreciate it.

To recap,

with an empty bread machine (no beans), and heat gun on high, I hit 300 in one minute, and 425 in three minutes.

with an empty bread machine, and heat gun on low, I reached 200 in one minute, 300 in four minutes, and gave up testing at seven minutes - only 340.

With a pound of beans, and high heat, I hit 1st crack around 6:30 to 7 minutes. This seems a little fast, so I've been trying to slow things down somewhat.

I will say, I don't trust my TC readings. I may borrow a friend's meter and TC, to check mine against his. The reason I don't trust the readings, is that I've had some roasts with first crack as low as 350.

thanks,

bill

 
seedlings
How's about a picture of your TC setup in the breadmaker?

CHAD
Roaster: CoffeeAir II 2# DIY air roaster
Grinder: Vintage Grindmaster 500
Brewers: Vintage Cory DCU DCL, Aeropress, Press, Osaka Titanium pourover
 
bvwelch
After watching CHAD's video (really cool-- stop reading this and go watch it!), I learned some things that I will try next time I roast.

Also, since his bread machine's loaf pan is a much different shape than mine, I think I can understand why he is getting better temp measurements than I am.

I'll send a photo of my loaf pan so you can see the difference. But since I only have $3 in this bread machine, I may just find another one that is more like CHAD's. I like the way his loaf pan is vertical. Mine is horizontal. Like if you turned CHAD's onto its side. So, with a pound of greens, I don't get very much depth, so my TC is not nearly as deep into the beans as CHAD's.

The biggest difference I saw in CHAD's approach, was how long he kept the coffee going after 1st crack. With the bread machine, I doubt if I've ever waited more than 2 minutes after 1st. I have a circuit that is equivalent to the router speed controller, that I can use on the heat gun. I hadn't done it much, because I was concerned that maybe it would harm the gun, since you're turning down both the heat and fan at the same time. But, it is only a $10 gun. I will pick up a spare one though just in case. I've already had to hot-wire around the thermal fuse after my first roast-- this was before I started using a "lid" like Stu has, which protects the gun itself from heat.

Bill
Edited by bvwelch on 04/23/2008 11:48 PM
 
boyntonstu

Quote

bvwelch wrote:
After watching CHAD's video (really cool-- stop reading this and go watch it!), I learned some things that I will try next time I roast.

Also, since his bread machine's loaf pan is a much different shape than mine, I think I can understand why he is getting better temp measurements than I am.

I'll send a photo of my loaf pan so you can see the difference. But since I only have $3 in this bread machine, I may just find another one that is more like CHAD's. I like the way his loaf pan is vertical. Mine is horizontal. Like if you turned CHAD's onto its side. So, with a pound of greens, I don't get very much depth, so my TC is not nearly as deep into the beans as CHAD's.

The biggest difference I saw in CHAD's approach, was how long he kept the coffee going after 1st crack. With the bread machine, I doubt if I've ever waited more than 2 minutes after 1st. I have a circuit that is equivalent to the router speed controller, that I can use on the heat gun. I hadn't done it much, because I was concerned that maybe it would harm the gun, since you're turning down both the heat and fan at the same time. But, it is only a $10 gun. I will pick up a spare one though just in case. I've already had to hot-wire around the thermal fuse after my first roast-- this was before I started using a "lid" like Stu has, which protects the gun itself from heat.

Bill


You have a HG with a 3 position switch, hi/lo/off.

Each position will control temperature.

You have a TC or a thermometer to indicate the temperature.

You have eyes, a nose, ears, and a fast acting finger controller.

Do you also need a router controller?

I find that I really do not even need any temperature indicator.

I mainly go by sound, smell, , smoke, and look.

BoyntonStu;)

BTW Was the video of decaf beans?

I did not see any chaff.
 
seedlings
Not decaf beans (don't have any use for them). Some chaff blows out the original air vent in the back of the lid, but most ends up on the bottom of the breadmaker. Didn't you notice the shopvac in the vid?

CHAD
Roaster: CoffeeAir II 2# DIY air roaster
Grinder: Vintage Grindmaster 500
Brewers: Vintage Cory DCU DCL, Aeropress, Press, Osaka Titanium pourover
 
boyntonstu

Quote

seedlings wrote:
Not decaf beans (don't have any use for them). Some chaff blows out the original air vent in the back of the lid, but most ends up on the bottom of the breadmaker. Didn't you notice the shopvac in the vid?

CHAD


Yes, I saw the great vid. Wonderful job!

However, when I roast, there is a cloud of chaff blowing out the slit in my cover.

Your system is very closed off in comparison to my setup.


How can you stand the temp of the tub and the beans with your hands?

350 degree beans, ouch!!!:(
 
seedlings
Stu, if you watch carefully I have a pair of plyers and a small wrench on the bench. Pick up the tub's handle with the plyers, then use the wrench to tip it upside down.


...Or... is my real name Clark Kent?

CHAD
Roaster: CoffeeAir II 2# DIY air roaster
Grinder: Vintage Grindmaster 500
Brewers: Vintage Cory DCU DCL, Aeropress, Press, Osaka Titanium pourover
 
bvwelch
I purchased a cheap ( $4 ) pair of leather "welders" gloves from Harbor Freight.

I am right-handed, so the left hand *always* has the glove on. I pull the right-hand glove on and off as needed, but keep the left glove on, in case I have to grab something or other... Kind of a Michael Jackson look with the one glove, but I think it is worth it.

bill
Edited by bvwelch on 04/25/2008 4:18 PM
 
boyntonstu

Quote

bvwelch wrote:
I purchased a cheap ( $4 ) pair of leather "welders" gloves from Harbor Freight.

I am right-handed, so the left hand *always* has the glove on. I pull the right-hand glove on and off as needed, but keep the left glove on, in case I have to grab something or other... Kind of a Michael Jackson look with the one glove, but I think it is worth it.

bill


Exactly what I use.

BoyntonStu
 
seedlings
Pliers: Free
Chubby wrench: Free
Great coffee roast: Priceless.

CHAD
Roaster: CoffeeAir II 2# DIY air roaster
Grinder: Vintage Grindmaster 500
Brewers: Vintage Cory DCU DCL, Aeropress, Press, Osaka Titanium pourover
 
bvwelch
Can't resist rubbing it in, about my bad roasts, huh?

I seem to recall we've both spilled the beans, literally. Did your pliers fail, or your wrench?

bill
 
seedlings

Quote

bvwelch wrote:
Can't resist rubbing it in, about my bad roasts, huh?

I seem to recall we've both spilled the beans, literally. Did your pliers fail, or your wrench?

bill


I've had so many bad roasts, spills, poorly engineered roasters... I'd never make fun of anyone but myself. The flip side is that if something is funny - it's funny. You know the cliche..."I'm laughing with you..."

I take pride in being the butt of my own jokes!!!!

CHAD
Roaster: CoffeeAir II 2# DIY air roaster
Grinder: Vintage Grindmaster 500
Brewers: Vintage Cory DCU DCL, Aeropress, Press, Osaka Titanium pourover
 
bvwelch
Yeah, I know, just having a little fun here too.

And by the way, even with my cheap glove, you can't hold the loaf pan too long. :-)

I may try the pliers.

And my wife stands at the ready with the fire extinguisher, since she witnessed my spilling of one pound of beans, which were still into 2nd crack as they lay scattered on the shop floor.

bill
Edited by bvwelch on 04/25/2008 9:19 PM
 
seedlings

Quote

bvwelch wrote:
And my wife stands at the ready with the fire extinguisher, since she witnessed my spilling of one pound of beans, which were still into 2nd crack as they lay scattered on the shop floor.


So, what you're saying is that she's supportive.

CHAD
;)
Roaster: CoffeeAir II 2# DIY air roaster
Grinder: Vintage Grindmaster 500
Brewers: Vintage Cory DCU DCL, Aeropress, Press, Osaka Titanium pourover
 
bvwelch
Yes, my wife is truly a blessing from above!

Today, I got the bright idea to modify my bread machine, to make it into more of a vertical style like yours, Chad.

Also, I tried an experiment-- I did the entire roast on the "low" heat gun setting. I donated one pound of my wife's Sumatra beans (sshhh don't tell).

I'm afraid they are "baked" beans -- that is the bad news. Some "good news", is that the TC gives much more reasonable readings now, with the "vertical" setup. I assume it is mostly due to how "tall" the column of beans are now, such that the TC is buried deep in the beans. But another factor might be that since the heat gun was on "low", and the beans "baked" slowly, the TC had plenty of time to "keep up" with the bean temperature.

Here are a few excepts from the "baked bean" profile-- it took twelve minutes to reach 300 F, and it didn't hit 395 F until a total of 25 minutes elapsed. I pulled the beans at 31 minutes, and a temp of 440.

Photos of the mods follow:

bvwelch.com/roast/bread1.jpg

bvwelch.com/roast/bread2.jpg

bvwelch.com/roast/bread3.jpg

bill
 
seedlings

Quote

bvwelch wrote:
Here are a few excepts from the "baked bean" profile-- it took twelve minutes to reach 300 F, and it didn't hit 395 F until a total of 25 minutes elapsed. I pulled the beans at 31 minutes, and a temp of 440.


:(

I just don't understand why the temp didn't come up. Could it be there is that much more area in your bread pan? I'm sorry to lead you to a pound of bland.

Be sure to brew some so you also know how baked tastes. I'm not joking. You don't have to drink but a sip, but pay attention to the smell of the grounds, dry and wet, and then the sip.

Unfortunately this is how we learn. The scruel of hard knocks.

I was just thinking... does your breadmaker still have the built in heat element, because maybe you just need a little heat boost?

CHAD
Edited by seedlings on 04/26/2008 8:57 PM
Roaster: CoffeeAir II 2# DIY air roaster
Grinder: Vintage Grindmaster 500
Brewers: Vintage Cory DCU DCL, Aeropress, Press, Osaka Titanium pourover
 
bvwelch
Hey Chad, no worries. I learned a lot. And I could tell, in the first 5 minutes, that this would probably be a "baked" situation, but I chose to go all the way to the end (on LOW heat), and took notes (in the interest of science).

I didn't mention it before, but with the new "vertical mod" in place, I did a dry run (no beans) on HIGH heat, and wow, the temp shot up like a rocket -- 450 F in about 80 seconds. So, in the future, with my '555 controller, or just manually switching from HIGH to LOW, I should have great control over the profile.

Also it was a good test of the new "vertical" mod, and the improved TC readings are very encouraging.

Personally, Sumatra seems flat to me anyway, so it may not be too different. We'll see in a few days.

bill
Edited by bvwelch on 04/26/2008 9:08 PM
 
David

Quote

bvwelch wrote:I didn't mention it before, but with the new "vertical mod" in place, I did a dry run (no beans) on HIGH heat, and wow, the temp shot up like a rocket -- 450 F in about 80 seconds. So, in the future, with my '555 controller, or just manually switching from HIGH to LOW, I should have great control over the profile.


Hi Bill,

The air does heat up in a hurry. But drop a pound or so of beans into the roaster and watch the temperature drop. Mine typically drops to about 120F before it starts to climb back up. Just something to be aware of when timing the roast.

Still, that 555 does promise a lot of control.

David
c:1
 
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